National Gardening Association: Gardening Resources

National Gardening Association: Gardening Resources

Garden.org is the home of the National Gardening Association, and has an active community of gardeners who gather to share ideas, information, and pictures about the plants they love. The whole site is free for everyone. Like what you see? Learn more about NGA or setup a free account and join in.
Today's Community Idea
Delightful Miniature GardeningDelightful Miniature Gardening
By beckygardener, April 29, 2016

The wonder of tiny items and plants can spill over into gardening. Have you ever thought of creating a miniature garden scene? You'll be surprised at how easy it is.

(Full article12 comments)
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Fiddle Leaf Ficus (Fig)Fiddle Leaf Ficus (Fig)
By drdawg, April 27, 2016

There always seems to be a lot of interest in and questions asked me about growing Fiddle Leaf Ficus as a houseplant. Along with questions, there is also a lot of confusion as to exactly what sort of houseplant the Fiddle Leaf actually is.

(Full article5 comments)
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The Excellent SorghumThe Excellent Sorghum
By dave, April 25, 2016

Sorghum is in the grass family and is closely related to corn. In fact, when it's young it is nearly impossible to differentiate it from corn. If anyone ever tells you they have volunteer corn in their garden, you can sound smart by guessing that it's sorghum.

(Full article16 comments)
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Cast Concrete LeavesCast Concrete Leaves
By HollyAnnS, April 23, 2016

Are you in need of a nice birdbath or fountain? Maybe you need a present for a friend or family member? Do you have some rather large leaves and don't know what to do with them? Maybe some nice big Hosta, Canna, Castor Bean, or tropical plant leaves? Well I have an idea: Let's make some cast concrete leaves.

(Full article12 comments)
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Preventing Premature Orchid Bloom DropPreventing Premature Orchid Bloom Drop
By TheOrchidGirl, April 22, 2016

Have you ever bought an orchid in bloom, only to see its flowers fall off a few days later? If so, read on! :D

(Full article8 comments)
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Staking Tall DelphiniumsStaking Tall Delphiniums
By foraygardengirl, April 21, 2016

Nothing is worse than watching your lovely tall spikes of blooming delphiniums get flattened by rain and wind.

(Full article9 comments)
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Juliet Grape Tomatoes. Productive and FoolproofJuliet Grape Tomatoes. Productive and Foolproof
By Newyorkrita, April 20, 2016

Try these remarkably carefree and productive grape-shaped tomatoes for salads or for eating fresh.

(Full article10 comments)
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Custom Planter BoxCustom Planter Box
By tropicgirl, April 19, 2016

I had an awkward space and wanted to block a garbage can, so I decided to build a custom planter box.

(Full article8 comments)
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PVC & Vinyl Lattice Garden Arch/TrellisPVC & Vinyl Lattice Garden Arch/Trellis
By Brinybay, April 18, 2016

For those who don't have technical skills or the patience to draw plans.

(Full article11 comments)
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Recent Images from the Plant Database
Photo of Sage (Salvia 'Big Swing') Photo of Ornamental Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas 'Sweet Georgia Heart Purple') Photo of Ornamental Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas 'Sweet Georgia Heart Purple') Photo of Lily (Lilium 'Lollypop') Photo of Sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas 'Heart Light Green') Photo of Sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas 'Heart Light Green') Photo of Salvia glabrescens Photo of Sage (Salvia transsylvanica) Photo of Variegated Japanese Woodland Sage (Salvia nipponica 'Fuji Snow')

» See more new plant database photos

New Multi-Plant Photos
Photo by GrammaChar Photo by RuuddeBlock Photo by ge1836 Photo by DomehomeDee Photo by Baja_Costero Photo by MISSINGROSIE Photo by jmorth Photo by Dutchlady1 Photo by ge1836

» See more new multi-plant photos

The newest comments to the plant database:
By Cyclaminist on Apr 30, 2016 4:36 PM, concerning plant: Small Flowered Buttercup (Ranunculus abortivus)

A very common buttercup throughout most of eastern North America. Flowers are tiny; the seeds are numerous, small, and hard; and it tends to be weedy. However, its flowers provide nectar and pollen to bees and flies, so it's worth having around.

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By jmorth on Apr 30, 2016 2:38 PM, concerning plant: Hosta (Hosta 'Miracle Lemony')

Hailed as the 1st yellow flowering Hosta. Foliage has wavy edges. Flowers have a nice, though light, fragrance. Grows to 16 inches tall. Sun to shade habitat. Adapts well to large containers.

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By Cyclaminist on Apr 30, 2016 2:37 PM, concerning plant: Prairie phlox (Phlox pilosa)

Prairie phlox has a lot of variation in the color and shape of the petals, so if you want a nice form, you should only buy plants that are blooming. My first prairie phlox, which wasn't blooming when I bought it, turned out to have light pink flowers that aren't very spectacular. The nicest forms, in my opinion, have deeper pink petals and dark markings around the mouth of the flower. There is also variation in petal size: wider petals are showier at a distance, while narrower petals make the flower more interesting.

The flowers are fragrant, and if you've got garden phlox (mid- or late-summer-blooming) or woodland phlox (spring-blooming), this is a great plant to extend the season of phlox fragrance. It blooms in between the bloom times of the two other species.

Phlox is self-incompatible: that means that the flowers will not be fertilized and produce seed unless pollen is transferred from another phlox plant that is different genetically. In my garden, I can attest to this, because I bought just one plant and never got any seed. Since I want it to self-seed, I got several more plants. Like all phlox, seed is in a round pod that splits open when ripe, and catapults the seed away from the parent plant.

Phlox produces nectar at the bottom of the floral tube and pollen on anthers near the opening of the floral tube. Because of the long floral tubes, only insects with long tongues can drink the nectar. That includes butterflies and very long-tongued bees (bumblebees). Shorter-tongued bees may try in vain to reach nectar, and shorter-tongued bees and flies may occasionally feed on the pollen, which is near the end of the floral tube.

The flower is ideal for butterflies because it has a large landing pad (the whorl of five petal tips on the end of the floral tube) and their tongues are more than long enough to reach down the tube, and they are the most effective pollinators. When they reach into the flower with their long tongues (proboscises), their tongue may pick up pollen, and if they visit another phlox flower that is different genetically and insert their tongue, they may touch that flower's stigma and transfer some pollen, which will fertilize the ovary and allow it to produce seed.

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By Cyclaminist on Apr 30, 2016 12:01 PM, concerning plant: Wholeleaf rosinweed (Silphium integrifolium)

A neater and shorter relative of cup plant (Silphium perfoliatum). It spreads by rhizomes to form clumps, but is much more manageable than many perennial sunflowers. Probably the best Silphium species for small gardens; the other species are very tall or have very large basal leaves. Drought-tolerant because of its deep fleshy roots.

Like the flowers of other Silphium species, these flowers provide food to longer-tongued bees, which can reach the nectar, and occasionally to butterflies. The seeds are large, flat, and lightweight, and are sometimes eaten by goldfinches.

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By eclayne on Apr 30, 2016 9:44 AM, concerning plant: Wisteria (Wisteria)

If you've ever researched a Wisteria before purchasing, you may have seen some mention of the way the stems and branches twine. Two ways to help identify a Wisteria, at least for species plants, are the direction of twining and the seed pod appearance.

Species that twine clockwise are:
Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) Seed pods are wholly or partially pubescent (hairy/fuzzy).

Species that twine counterclockwise (anticlockwise) are:
American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) Seed pods are glabrous (smooth).
Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) Seed pods are wholly or partially pubescent (hairy/fuzzy).
Silky Wisteria (Wisteria brachybotrys) Seed pods are wholly or partially pubescent (hairy/fuzzy).

Exceptions do exist. Silky Wisteria (Wisteria brachybotrys 'Murasaki-Kapitan') twines clockwise, while the direction of twining in species hybrids will depend on the parent plants involved.

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© 2016 Dash Works, LLC
Times are presented in US Central Standard Time
Today's site banner is by needrain and is called "airport orchids"

About - Contact - Terms of Service - Privacy - Memberlist - Acorns - Links - Ask a Question - Newsletter

Follow us on TwitterWe are on Facebook.We Pin at Pinterest.Subscribe to our Youtube ChannelView our instagram

National Garden Month