National Gardening Association: Gardening Resources

National Gardening Association: Gardening Resources

Garden.org is the home of the National Gardening Association, and has an active community of gardeners who gather to share ideas, information, and pictures about the plants they love. The whole site is free for everyone. Like what you see? Learn more about NGA or setup a free account and join in.
Today's Community Idea
The Monarchs Grace Us with Their PresenceThe Monarchs Grace Us with Their Presence
By frostweed, May 24, 2016

Raising Monarchs indoors helps to protect them from predators and assists them in their struggle for survival, increasing their numbers during this difficult time of diminishing habitat.

(Full article9 comments)
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Tomato Trellis Using 4 Cattle PanelsTomato Trellis Using 4 Cattle Panels
By Thomas75, May 21, 2016

Here's a tutorial on building a simple trellis to support tomatoes even during the worst weather conditions.

(Full article11 comments)
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Making Your Own Standard RosesMaking Your Own Standard Roses
By sunnyvalley, May 18, 2016

This last winter wasn’t as cold as most, at least not for us, but you may still have some roses that have not survived. Sometimes you only lose the grafted rose and come spring all you see are suckers from the rootstock. Depressing, but look on the bright side - those suckers are ideal for making your own standard roses!

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The May 2016 Not-A-Raffle-Raffle!The May 2016 Not-A-Raffle-Raffle!
By dave, May 16, 2016

Finally, this month's raffle is ready! We have some great prizes lined up, come in and check it out.

(Full article61 comments)
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The Garden Tower 2 ReviewThe Garden Tower 2 Review
By dave, May 9, 2016

What a pleasure to get my hands on this combination vertical garden/vermicomposting system. Watch my video and read about this innovative gardening container.

(Full article36 comments)
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Delightful Miniature GardeningDelightful Miniature Gardening
By beckygardener, April 29, 2016

The wonder of tiny items and plants can spill over into gardening. Have you ever thought of creating a miniature garden scene? You'll be surprised at how easy it is.

(Full article15 comments)
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Fiddle Leaf Ficus (Fig)Fiddle Leaf Ficus (Fig)
By drdawg, April 27, 2016

There always seems to be a lot of interest in and questions asked me about growing Fiddle Leaf Ficus as a houseplant. Along with questions, there is also a lot of confusion as to exactly what sort of houseplant the Fiddle Leaf actually is.

(Full article9 comments)
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The Excellent SorghumThe Excellent Sorghum
By dave, April 25, 2016

Sorghum is in the grass family and is closely related to corn. In fact, when it's young it is nearly impossible to differentiate it from corn. If anyone ever tells you they have volunteer corn in their garden, you can sound smart by guessing that it's sorghum.

(Full article23 comments)
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Cast Concrete LeavesCast Concrete Leaves
By HollyAnnS, April 23, 2016

Are you in need of a nice birdbath or fountain? Maybe you need a present for a friend or family member? Do you have some rather large leaves and don't know what to do with them? Maybe some nice big Hosta, Canna, Castor Bean, or tropical plant leaves? Well I have an idea: Let's make some cast concrete leaves.

(Full article12 comments)
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Recent Images from the Plant Database
Photo of Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Patchwork Puzzle') Photo of Intermediate Bearded Iris (Iris 'John') Photo of Goldenchain Tree (Laburnum x watereri) Photo of Hinoki False Cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Kosteri') Photo of Japanese Black Pine (Pinus thunbergii 'Thunderhead') Photo of Autumn sage (Salvia greggii Mesa™ Purple) Photo of Bee Balm (Monarda 'Peter's Purple') Photo of Hosta (Hosta 'Silver Star') Photo of Hosta (Hosta 'Trifecta')

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New Multi-Plant Photos
Photo by GrammaChar Photo by Paul2032 Photo by Paul2032 Photo by pirl Photo by Maxlady0817 Photo by Maxlady0817 Photo by aspenhill Photo by sunnyvalley

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The newest comments to the plant database:
By Bonehead on May 24, 2016 11:29 AM, concerning plant: Goldenchain Tree (Laburnum x watereri)

Provides food for the larvae of Lepidoptera. It does sucker, but not too badly for me - mostly coming from the base of the trunk rather than the surrounding soil, so easy enough to just trim off with clippers. Nice bright yellow in early spring.

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By Cyclaminist on May 23, 2016 11:22 PM, concerning plant: European Cyclamen (Cyclamen purpurascens)

In the wild, European cyclamens often grow in beech woods (or so I hear). Beeches often keep some dried leaves on their branches over the winter and drop them in spring (a pattern called marcescence). European cyclamens are well adapted to this pattern: they grow new leaves in summer, after the beech leaves fall, and thus the new cyclamen leaves will be able to grow on top of the fallen beech leaves, rather than being covered by them. The cyclamens might have a harder time growing under other deciduous trees that lose their leaves in the fall, since the fallen leaves would cover the cyclamen leaves and prevent them from photosynthesizing in the spring, and thereby retard their growth and blooming.

Anyway, that's my theory. Related to this, the ideal time to mulch (or transplant) European cyclamens is in late spring or early summer, immediately before they grow new leaves and bloom. That way, the new leaves that grow in summer will be able to grow on top of the mulch (or the leaves inevitably messed up from transplanting can be replaced by a new and orderly set of leaves).

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By critterologist on May 23, 2016 10:23 PM, concerning plant: Acanthocereus (Acanthocereus tetragonus 'Fairy Castle')

Such a charming little plant! I've grown this on my south-facing windowsill for 8+ years. It increases slowly in both size and complexity, with little nubs forming on the spires and then themselves growing up into new spires. In cold winter weather, I've learned to move it back from the window, or you'll get some pale/tan areas of damage (it greens up again when you move it to a warmer spot). Although this cactus has loads of little spines, if you handle it gently you don't get prickled. I recently broke off a number of "spires" around the outer part of the base, both to bring the plant back in proportion with its pot and to have some pieces to share. If you grab a "finger" and gently wriggle/tug it loose, working as close to the base of the plant as possible, you'll get a piece that either has roots or will root readily. (If you've ever separated a banana "pup," that's basically what I did, on a smaller scale.) My plant started from 3 "fingers" shared by a friend, and now I've shared it in turn!

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By Cyclaminist on May 23, 2016 8:44 PM, concerning plant: False Rue Anemone (Enemion biternatum)

A spring ephemeral with small white flowers and lovely compound leaves, native to the east-central United States and the southern tip of Ontario. Easy to confuse with Rue Anemone (Thalictrum thalictroides) and Wood anemone (Anemone quinquefolia) . Unlike them, it spreads gradually each year by underground rhizomes to form a closely spaced clump.

A little-known fact: evergreen basal leaves emerge in the fall, last through the winter, then go dormant along with the flower stems in summer.

Like many plants in the buttercup family, it only produces pollen. Medium to small bees visit it to gather the pollen for their nests (the flowers are too small to provide enough pollen for bumblebees and the stems too delicate to support them), and hoverflies eat the pollen.

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By HemNorth on May 23, 2016 7:55 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Final Touch')

I have found Final Touch to start blooming surprisingly early. With a name like that, I thought it would be a late starter, but it actually starts in about the first week of July (probably mid-June this year). It blooms for a season lasting at least four to six weeks. Quite often there are still buds coming into the beginning of frost, which would be September or even October. The only other daylily that might have a longer run, is Clin d'oeil a Zoe, bred by the owners of Hemerocallis Montfort in Quebec. It was the first coloured daylily other than Middendorfii and Aztec Evergreen, (the yellows and the golds) to start early, (this year it already started on May 19th), and it will keep going into October or November, depending on our first hard frost date.

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National Gardening Association

© 2016 Dash Works, LLC
Times are presented in US Central Standard Time
Today's site banner is by Paul2032 and is called "Fall Aster"

About - Contact - Terms of Service - Privacy - Memberlist - Acorns - Links - Ask a Question - Newsletter

Follow us on TwitterWe are on Facebook.We Pin at Pinterest.Subscribe to our Youtube ChannelView our instagram