Growing Marjoram

Shakespeare knew his herbs, and characterized them in his work. In All?s Well that Ends Well, someone gives a compliment, describing another as, "the sweet marjoram of the salad, or rather the herb of grace." It is a delightful herb, at once sweet and savory. Use it in sauces, egg dishes, fish, poultry, and, as the Bard alludes, in salads.

Origanum majorana goes by several common names: sweet marjoram, garden marjoram, and annual marjoram. It is hardy only to USDA Zone 9 and rarely survives even mild winters. Plant seeds or purchase plants each spring. Sweet marjoram has an upright, bushy growth habit and can reach a foot in height. (Where perennial, it can reach 2 feet.)

Growing Marjoram

Start the tiny seeds indoors under grow lights about 6 weeks before the last frost date in your region. Set out seedlings in full sun in slightly alkaline soil that's rich in organic matter. Place plants about 6 to 8 inches apart, or in clumps of two or three plants set 12 to 14 inches apart, and keep the soil slightly moist until they are growing vigorously. Pinch back stems to maintain a bushy growth habit. After each harvest, add 1 inch of compost in a 12-inch-wide band around the plants.

Harvest and Storage

When flowers appear, cut entire plants to stand 3 to 4 inches tall, and repeat as more flower buds appear. Use leaves fresh, and dry some for winter use. Leaves dry quickly and retain their flavor well. To dry, tie stems together and hang bunches upside down in a shady, dry, well-ventilated place. After drying, remove leaves from stems and store in an airtight container.

Other articles in this series:
1. Growing Mint
2. Growing Chives
3. Growing French Tarragon
4. Growing Oregano
5. Growing Marjoram ← you're on this article right now
6. Growing Thyme
7. All About Rosemary

This article is a part of our Herb Gardening Guide for Perennial Herbs.

[ADVERTISEMENT]

National Gardening Association

© 2016 Dash Works, LLC
Times are presented in US Central Standard Time
Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Yay Spring!"

About - Contact - Terms of Service - Privacy - Memberlist - Acorns - Links - Ask a Question - Newsletter

Follow us on TwitterWe are on Facebook.We Pin at Pinterest.Subscribe to our Youtube ChannelView our instagram