The Q&A Archives: Pomegranate

Question: Can pomegranate(s) be grown from seed? If so, can you tell me how and under what conditions?

Answer: Pomegranate (botanical name Punica) can be started from seed, but if you're in a hurry to see your plant produce fruit, you might want to take a cutting of a plant to start a new one instead of growing one from seed. Here's how to start a pomegranate from seed: carefully remove seeds from a ripe pomegranate. Spread whole, undamaged seeds on a papertowel to allow them to dry. If you try to remove the fleshy covering, you may damage the seed, so it's best just to let it dry out on its own. Once the seeds are dry, they will have completed their resting (or dormant) period and should germinate without problem. Since the seeds have a hard coat, you can soften it up prior to planting by dropping the seeds into a cupful of hot water. Remove the seeds after 24 hours and plant them just on the surface of moistened seed starting mix. Press them in slightly, but don't cover them. The seeds need light to germinate. After sowing, cover the pots or trays with plastic wrap to help retain moisture, and place in a warm area such as on top of the refrigerator or on greenhouse propagation mats. The seeds should germinate in 30-40 days when kept at 70F - 75F. As soon as they sprout, remove the plastic wrap and place the seedlings under a source of bright light. Good luck!

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