The Q&A Archives: Transplanting Salvia

Question: I would like advice on transplanting my red Salvia gregii which has been growing against the north facing side of the house to the south facing side. I anticipated that it would do well in its' current location because of the 3-4 hours of hot afternoon sun the spot receives. The plant grew very gangly and had few blooms despite great soil and good fertilization, so I am sure that it needs transplanting to a site that receives more sun however I'm afraid to kill it in the move. We have had our first few overnight frosts this year, but it rarely stays below 35 degrees on any given winter day in our city. What should I do?


If your salvia isn't performing as expected, moving them to a better location is a good idea. I'd wait until spring to move the plants. Transplanting can shock the plants and coupled with the cold winter weather, your salvia may not be strong enough to cope with the stress. In the spring, when the plants begin to put out new growth, dig and transplant them. Salvia greggii is known as Autumn Salvia and has a potential to grow 3' tall. If your plants are tall, it might be a normal growth habit. If, on the other hand, they look as though they're stretching out to reach the sun, they may be misplaced and moving them is a good idea.

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