The Q&A Archives: Meyer Lemon

Question: Regarding a dwarf improved meyer lemon tree planted in the ground in zone 11 one mile from the ocean, what size containers are they available in and how prolific is the fruiting of the tree? What height and girth would the tree attain in five years?

Thanks, you have a good web site


Answer: The Meyer Lemon Tree is a hardy variety and the best lemon tree for sub-tropical climates such as yours. The Meyer Lemon is not actually a lemon but a cross between a lemon, a type of orange and a mandarin. While it retains most of the characteristics of a lemon, it has a bit less acidity, less bitterness, more sweetness and thinner skin. The skin of the Meyer Lemon lacks the typical zest of a real lemon. It has gained favor because it bears a heavy crop and it is a relatively hardy plant.

Here are some growing guidelines:
Performs best with full sun (at least 8 hours per day).
Regular water with well dranined soil. No wet feet.
Hardy to 25 degrees farenheit.
Can grow in a pot to restrict size, or will grows to 15 feet tall and wide if planted in the ground.
Sandy, well-drained, dry, alkaline soil works best.
Tolerates acidic soil if necessary.
Rounded growth habit.
Medium rate of growth. (grafted onto dwarfing rootstock, the trees will grow slowly, about 6" per year.)

The Meyer Lemon bears heavily when mature. Its crop size increases as the plant matures. It may bear 10 or more lemons even at 3 years old. The fruit is green in color until it matures. When mature on the tree, the Meyer Lemon changes to a yellow-orange color. The main crop matures in the summer. In a tropical climate, the Meyer Lemon Tree can bear fruit nearly all year long.

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