Answer: Michele,

Pineapples do best in a well-drained soil that is slightly acid with medium fertility. I suggest you choose a high quality potting mix. Then perhaps add a little (10 to 20%) washed, coarse sand to make your grown mix. Keep them in a bright area (direct sunlight is best) and protect them from temperatures below 45 degrees. Fertilize them periodically with a soluble fertilizer product like Miracle Gro at the lower label rate.

It is quite easy to propagate a new pineapple plant from a fruit you brought home from the grocery store, especially during the warmer months of the year.

Cut off the crown or leafy top portion of the pineapple fruit an inch or two below where the leaves attach to the fruit. Remove any of the pulpy fruit flesh clinging to the base of the crown. Then set the crown aside for a week or two to cure.

After curing, pull off the lowest tier of leaves and plant the crown in a rich potting soil covering the base up to where the lower leaves attach. Water thoroughly at planting and then only lightly a couple of times a week. Avoid keeping the soil too wet. Place the plant in a very bright area but out of direct sunlight for a few weeks. When the plant develops roots and new top growth is evident, move it to a bright, sunny location and increase the watering and fertilizing.

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