The Q&A Archives: Coral Vine

Question: I gathered some seeds from a coral vine in Florida last fall. Two of the seeds have now sprouted and reached an approximate height of 4 feet. My question is, do you think this vine will survive in our climate, which obviously is not at all like Palm Coast Florida. And, if so, how should I treat it as the fall season arrives? Or, is this a hopeless endeavor? Thank you so much for your imput.

Answer: Coral Vine is Antigonon leptopus, a tender perennial vine can easily grow to 30-40 ft (9-12 m) in length and uses its tendrils to happily and rapidly climb up, over and upon any nearby object. Evergreen in frostfree areas, the coral vine has attractive green heart-shaped leaves that are 4 (10 cm). In summer the vine produces large branching flower stalks (racemes) upon which masses of small flowers are situated. The actual flowers are tiny but the sepals are larger and provide the brilliant colors that range from white to rose-pink to deep coral flowered varieties.

Coral vine is native to Mexico and is grown as a landscape plant in mild winter regions of the United States. This adaptable vine will grow in almost any soil.
It needs full sun for best bloom and likes moist well-drained soil but tolerates drought. It is hardy in USDA Zones 8-10. In Zone 8 the tops of this tropical plant are killed back by freezes but it rapidly recovers provided the roots are protected from freezing (mulch well). In Zone 8 flowering usually doesn't begin until fall.

I'd say enjoy your plant; mulch over the roots to protect them in winter, and expect a display of flowers in late summer.

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