The Q&A Archives: Wintering a Green-Leaved Euryops

Question: I bought 2 Green-Leaved Euryops this spring and had them outside. They made beautiful flowers all season and seemed to thrive in the pots. I have recently brought them indoors, owing to the cooler temperatures, and their health seems to have taken a dive. The first is a green worm cocooning underneath a leaf. The second is brownish dry spots on the leaves and the third issue is clear-tan colored crystals (about the size of salt crystals) crusted at the tips of the branches, where new leaf and flower growth occur.

I'm not sure if these issues are related or separate and how to fix them. I am desperate to get information regarding the winter care of these plants, so can anyone help me?

Brigitte Comte

Answer: Euryops is a native of South Africa and should be wintered over indoors in cold climates. Taking your plant inside is a good first step. The drying leaves are probably a natural reaction to the change in temperature and humidity your plant is experiencing. As it adjusts to these changes, it will likely lose some leaves. You can prune it back to remove the browning leaves. First, remove the cocoon - you don't want pests invading your home. The second concern is the fluid oozing from the stems. This could indicate additional pests, or simply wounds where sucking insects have been feeding. Again, pruning these plant parts away should rid your plant of pests. As for all houseplants, bright light, average household temperatures, occasional misting with plain water, and keeping the soil moist but not soggy wet should help your Euryops get through the winter season. When you take it back outdoors next spring it should overcome the stress of being indoors and flourish. Best wishes with your Euryops!

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