The Q&A Archives: What causes a new tree to die out?

Question: The tree we bought is like an evergreen tree and after we planted it, the weather was extremely hot. We watered it and gave it root food and it just died off. We want to replant another tree in place of that one and need to know where to get Monrovia trees and how to help the trees from dying. Thank you for your help.

Answer: I'm sorry you lost your tree. Based on your description, I am not certain exactly what happened with your tree. In general, a new tree should be planted at the same depth as it grew before and planted into a hole that is dug several times wider than the rootball and about the same depth. It should be watered as needed to keep the soil evenly moist, meaning damp like a wrung out sponge and never saturated/sopping wet or dried out. There should be a flat layer of mulch over the root area, it should be two to three inches deep and should not touch the trunk.

Trees can die if the planting technique is poor, if they are not watered properly after planting, or if they are not suited to the spot where they are planted. Sometimes too a disease or pest can kill a new tree, as can overfertilizing or accidental herbicide exposure.

It is very difficult to diagnose the loss of a tree by long distance. I would suggest you consult with your retailer to see if they can help you figure out what happened -- and if there was a warranty. Your professionally trained nurseryman and your local county extension may also have suggestions as to the best type of tree to plant in the location you have in mind.

There is a zip code based listing of retailers that carry Monrovia products at the web site,

You may also find the following publication helpful as you start your research.

Good luck with your planting!

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