The Q&A Archives: Chinese Pistache

Question: I planted a pistache tree 2 years ago from a 5 gallon can. It was moved once and never has thrived - it should give off shade when I'm about 150 years old. I'm looking for ideas for a more traditional shade tree. Since I'm planning to move in 5 years, I don't another slow grower. Any ideas?<br>Any harm in moving the pistache again?<br>

Answer: Your Chinese Pistache should be a moderate grower to about 60 feet tall and 50 feet wide. Young trees are often gawky and lopsided, but trees become dense and shapely as they mature. Your tree probably suffered a set back when it was moved. It generally takes tress and shrubs about one year to become established in their new homes. (There's a certain amount of shock to their systems when trees are planted and transplanted.) While it has the potential to grow into a magnificent shade tree, moving yourpistache every year or two barely gives it time to become established, let alone put on new growth. If you're looking for a fast growing shade tree, try a fruitless Mulberry. The leaves are large, the growth rate vigorous, and they're attractive trees. The fruitless (male) cultivar will flower in the spring but will not produce the juicy berry-like fruit that stains sidewalks and makes walking under it quite so treacherous. Maple trees are another fast growing shade tree choice. There are many leaf color choices in the Maple family. Hope you find a shade tree you can enjoy!

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