The Q&A Archives: About Arkansas violets

Question: Hi, we have thousands of the Arkansas violets - on the lawn, in flower beds, everywhere. And while they look real pretty right now, since they are blooming now (they look just like violets), they are a pest and spread incredibly. We've been picking them out one at a time, cause you have to get the whole root so they wont come back, but there has to be an easier and better way!? Can you help?

Answer: Controlling wild violets in a lawn or landscape can be a difficult challenge, and will certainly require more than one herbicide application before it is accomplished. Violets should be targeted for control in fall as they are preparing to go into winter. Plants take in herbicides most readily during this time. Very poor control is the usual result of attempts to control violets during the summer. Dicamba and triclopyr are two herbicides often included in products providing control of violets. Read the product labels carefully, making sure that violets are listed on the label, before buying any herbicide product. The waxy coating on violet leaves causes liquid herbicides to quickly run off the leaf after application, with little chemical being taken in by the plant. For this reason, herbicide applications targeted at violets should include a spreader-sticker. This product helps the chemical ?stick? on the weed leaves better, resulting in better herbicide absorption and thus giving better control.

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