The Q&A Archives: Lawn Overtaken by Moss

Question: My lawn has been taken over by moss. I know my ph is low and I need to increase its fertility, but where should I start. Should I do small patches at a time, or large section? Thanks

Answer: Moss is usually a symptom of several problems, including poor drainage, too much shade, low fertility, compacted soil, and acid soil. If you can correct these problems, and put your lawn on a regular feeding schedule, you'll have fewer moss problems. Rake out the mossy areas and then aerate the entire lawn with a core aerator (you can rent the equipment). Do so this now, leaving the plugs on the lawn. Spread a thin layer of sand over the lawn and allow the plugs to dissolve in rain water or irrigation water. The sand and the soil from the plugs will work its way into the holes left by the aerator effectively reducing compaction and giving excess moisture a way to escape. When the plugs dissolve, overseed the entire lawn. When the grass is up and growing, feed with a 3-1-2 ratio of NPK (the 3 numbers on the bag of fertilizer). Apply one pound of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet of lawn per year. Feed again in June, September and late November. If your grass is healthy, it will crowd out the moss in the future.This should help. Best wishes with your lawn!

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