The Q&A Archives: female sago palm flower

Question: My sago recently bloomed and I want to know if I need to remove the flower? It seems that other similar plants that bloom end up deformed or dead after blooming. Will that happen with my sago? Does she require any special care now or after blooming? Thank you! (Sorry if this is a repeat question, I wasn't sure it went through)

Answer: Sago palms usually flower every 3-4 years and they generally show no ill effects from this natural cycle. Male flowers are upright; female flowers are round. If the flower is pollinated by a nearby male, the flower will close up and develop seeds. Seed slowly develop during the summer, become walnut-size, turn from yellow to bright orange in the winter, and are ready to be removed from the "mama" Sago in January through March of the following year. Seed that are ready to harvest will easily pull off the plant and be about the size of a walnut. After the seeds are harvested, the remaining flower portions will die and decompose. Don't pull or cut it away from the plant until you are sure it's dead. Or just leave it alone: New leaves will develop on your sago and eventually cover up the scar from the flower.

Best wishes with your sago!

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