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By BetNC on Dec 5, 2016 12:04 PM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Siletz')

This plant was a disappointment; it is not suitable for both the climate and the method it was grown. I grew it in a 5-gal bucket and it was in protective shade from midafternoon on. It was a poor producer (only 24 harvestable fruit, only 3 after 8-8), with most ripening fruit having to be discarded because of cracking and rotting. It is prone to cracking (in body of fruit, leading to rot setting in). It did not continue to set fruit in the heat. I will not grow this again.

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By Marilyn on Dec 3, 2016 4:29 PM, concerning plant: Anise-Scented Sage (Salvia coerulea 'Elk Argentina Skies')

Anise-Scented Sage (Salvia 'Elk Argentina Skies') is a new introduction from Flowers By The Sea and is superior to the 'Argentina Skies' salvia.

FBTS grows, sells and specializes in salvias. They are in Elk, CA.

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By Bonehead on Dec 2, 2016 9:05 PM, concerning plant: Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis)

Native in the Pacific NW. Found at the edges of swamps and wetlands. Very prickly stiff needles, which purportedly have special powers for protection against evil thoughts. I find my native spruce trees look somewhat like cheerleaders - the upper branches reach to the sky before they get heavy enough to drape down. Makes it easy to pick them out when looking down at a stand of trees.

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By Bonehead on Dec 2, 2016 8:59 PM, concerning plant: Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens)

Slow growing, very symmetrical evergreen. Quite striking with its blue-green needles, very prickly. The inner bark and young shoots are edible. The bark and pitch may be used for medicinal purposes. Legend has it that the sharp needles give it special powers for protection against evil thoughts.

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By Bonehead on Dec 2, 2016 7:05 PM, concerning plant: Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum 'Red Wood')

This is a tall vase-shaped Japanese maple, with distinctive red bark. The leaves are smallish, emerging green with a red margin around the edges, and turning pale yellow in the fall. Mine is growing in full shade under mature fir trees, with elderberries and snowberries at its feet.

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By lauriebasler on Dec 2, 2016 6:07 AM, concerning plant: Pony Tail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

I have several Pony Tails, and after separating 3 in a pot, I found that one seemingly healthy plant got the droopy leaves some of these plants have. I prefer the ones that curl out roundly; they look healthier.. After being diligent at giving it the same conditions as the ones that were not drooping, for many months, with no change, I decided to cut my losses on it, and experiment. I took a rubber band, and pulled the leaves up like a pony tail, securing it loosely, and it did look strange. Then I let the plant get much drier than the others, for a month or so. To my surprise, it worked. The plants leaves are as bouncy and graceful as the others now. I am careful to let it get quite dry between waterings. Hope it works for others.

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By farmerdill on Dec 1, 2016 6:07 PM, concerning plant: Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas 'Diane')

I have not been able to uncover much history on this sweet potato. It grows as rampant vines with a unique leaf shape, which reminds me of a sweet gum leaf. Skin is red with dark orange flesh. Flesh is sweet and moist. On my palate, not as good flavor as Copper Jewel or Carolina Ruby, but acceptable. Yields are good, but not quite to the level of Beauregard, Covington, Carolina Ruby, or Jewel. Good enough, though, that I will give it a second trial in 2017.

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By pardalinum on Nov 30, 2016 7:14 PM, concerning plant: Lily (Lilium 'Pink Dream')

This is one of those lilies that can be easily confused with some others with its pink-yellow color blend. It is distinguished by a unique dark red stem.

It is not registered but was sold by a reputable company. The RHS Lily register may someday catch up with it. Not to be confused with the registered Pink Dream Group which are a group of similar Oriental lilies.

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By Australis on Nov 29, 2016 5:23 AM, concerning plant: Lily (Lilium 'Pink Flavour')

Due to confusion with this cultivar and a few similar lilies, I strongly recommend checking with the RHS lily register to confirm the identity of the plant. A few key distinctions between the similar-looking 'My Joe Ann', 'Pink Flavour and 'Pearl Jessica' lilies are:

'My Joe Ann' is recorded as growing to 1.2-1.5m and 'Pink Flavour' to 1.2m, but 'Pearl Jessica' is recorded as only 0.7m.

'My Joe Ann' has a (darker) pink throat, whilst 'Pink Flavour' has a light yellow-green throat and 'Pearl Jessica' has a light yellow-orange throat.

Hankz also notes that 'My Joe Ann' is often mislabelled, the stems are almost black (the register says they are mid-green) and it does not have secondary buds in his post here: http://garden.org/thread/view_post/719381/

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By Australis on Nov 29, 2016 4:39 AM, concerning plant: Lily (Lilium 'Pearl Jessica')

Due to confusion with this cultivar and a few similar lilies, I strongly recommend checking with the RHS lily register to confirm the identity of the plant. A few key distinctions between the similar-looking 'My Joe Ann', 'Pink Flavour and 'Pearl Jessica' lilies are:

'My Joe Ann' is recorded as growing to 1.2-1.5m and 'Pink Flavour' to 1.2m, but 'Pearl Jessica' is recorded as only 0.7m.

'My Joe Ann' has a (darker) pink throat, whilst 'Pink Flavour' has a light yellow-green throat and 'Pearl Jessica' has a light yellow-orange throat.

Hankz also notes that 'My Joe Ann' is often mislabelled, the stems are almost black (the register says they are mid-green) and it does not have secondary buds in his post here: http://garden.org/thread/view_post/719381/

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By Australis on Nov 29, 2016 4:37 AM, concerning plant: Lily (Lilium 'My Joe Ann')

Due to confusion with this cultivar and a few similar lilies, I strongly recommend checking with the RHS lily register to confirm the identity of the plant. A few key distinctions between the similar-looking 'My Joe Ann', 'Pink Flavour and 'Pearl Jessica' lilies are:

'My Joe Ann' is recorded as growing to 1.2-1.5m and 'Pink Flavour' to 1.2m, but 'Pearl Jessica' is recorded as only 0.7m.

'My Joe Ann' has a (darker) pink throat, whilst 'Pink Flavour' has a light yellow-green throat and 'Pearl Jessica' has a light yellow-orange throat.

Hankz also notes that 'My Joe Ann' is often mislabelled, the stems are almost black (the register says they are mid-green) and it does not have secondary buds in his post here: http://garden.org/thread/view_post/719381/

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By Australis on Nov 27, 2016 4:04 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Grammatocymbidium Ayodhaya)

This hybrid is registered as Cymbidium Ayodhaya and the parentage given as Golden Vanguard X Valerie Absolonova. However, according to the hybridiser, he used mixed pollen of Valerie Absolonova (3n) and Grammatophyllum scriptum (2n) on Golden Vanguard (4n). All the resulting progeny have strong Cymbidium traits but have key traits found in F1 Grammatocymbidium hybrids, something that wasn't initially recognised. Hence the true parentage of the few seedlings resulting from the cross should be Golden Vanguard (4n) X Gramm. scriptum (2n).

Source: http://69.195.124.90/~newhorm4/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=243...

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By ArnaldoRentes on Nov 27, 2016 10:14 AM, concerning plant: Dwarf Trumpet Tree (Tabebuia 'Apricot')

Finally, I discovered the identity of this polychromatic ipê. Both parent species - Handroanthus impetiginosus and H. chrysotrichus - are native here in Sao Paulo and I have planted many of these wonderful trees. But from this hybrid I only know an individual, near my house, in Guarujá. I asked my friends and colleagues, botanists and landscapers, but no one knew how to give me the information I find now on your website. Thank you for that!
Does anyone know if it can be propagated by cutting and what type (apical, median, basal etc.)?

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By Hemophobic on Nov 25, 2016 8:07 PM, concerning plant: Gazania (Gazania rigens 'Sunshine Mix')

I love these! In fact, I have one blooming today, Nov. 25, due to our unseasonably long warm autumn. Great plant with a lovely, unique flower!

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 25, 2016 6:38 PM, concerning plant: Aloe (Aloe cameronii)

Widespread, variable medium-sized aloe from southern Africa with a low, suckering habit. The leaves can turn intense copper red in full sun, drought, or winter conditions. One of the best aloes for red foliage. Tolerant of drought and exposure. Flowers are usually red but can also be orange or yellow, and appear in early winter.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 25, 2016 2:05 PM, concerning plant: Mopane Aloe (Aloe littoralis)

Single-stemmed tree aloe to 3-4m tall with reddish flowers on highly branched inflorescences. Very widespread distribution in Southern Africa. Closely related to the shorter-stemmed A. esculenta and A. kaokensis. Recently absorbed the species formerly known as A. angolensis. Found in dry sandy soils, but not restricted to the coast as the species name might suggest. Slow growing in cultivation compared to the more common tree aloes. Found on the coat of arms of Windhoek, Namibia and on that country's 5 cent coin.

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By Marilyn on Nov 25, 2016 2:38 AM, concerning plant: Jame Sage (Salvia 'Elk Chantily Lace')

Salvia 'Elk Chantily Lace' is a new Flowers By The Sea introduction. They grow, sell and specialize in salvias. FBTS is located in Elk, Ca.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 24, 2016 10:47 PM, concerning plant: Barrel Cactus (Ferocactus robustus)

Small-stemmed, clumping Ferocactus which grows in great mounds to 1m high and 5m wide with extended age. Yellow flowers. Fat penetrating roots. From Puebla. The only member of the genus with this prolific branching habit.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 24, 2016 10:34 PM, concerning plant: Aloe Vera (Aloe vera)

Aloe vera (formerly known as barbadensis) is a yellow-flowered plant with mostly unspotted adult leaves. Its medicinal application involves topical use of the gel for skin-related ailments. The flowers (always yellow) are ventricose, meaning they have a little belly on the underside, a distinguishing feature. Aloe vera does not produce viable seeds, another distinguishing feature, and thus can only be grown true from offsets.

The Arabian aloe formerly known as Aloe vera chinensis was placed under Aloe officinalis with the publication of Aloes (2011). This second plant (also medicinal) can be distinguished by spotted leaves on adult plants, generally smaller proportions, orange or coral flowers (usually), and distinct medicinal usage.

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By Marilyn on Nov 24, 2016 9:54 PM, concerning plant: Scarlet Sage (Salvia splendens 'Van Houttei Elk White')

Salvia splendens 'Van Houttei Elk White' is a new introduction for 2017. FBTS sells, grows, and specializes in salvias and is located in Elk, CA.

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