Vines and Climbers forum: vertical gardens

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hazelnut
Jun 9, 2012 9:53 AM CST
Im always trying to get the climbers OFF my walls. English ivy, poison ivy, trumpet creeper, Asian wisteria, wild clematis and smilax.

But maybe there is a place and situation for these pesky plants!



http://www.hulu.com/watch/219371
[Last edited by hazelnut - Jun 9, 2012 9:56 AM (+)]
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Name: Mary Stella
Anchorage, AK (Zone 4b)
Peonies Ponds Dahlias Canning and food preservation Lilies Permaculture
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Oberon46
Jun 13, 2012 9:22 PM CST
I would kill to successfully get climbers. I would decorate all my fences with them. Preferably kiwi's that bear fruit.
"What a person needs in gardening is a cast iron back with a hinge in it" Charles Dudley Warner (spelling edited by Dinu lol)

Charter ATP Member
hazelnut
Jun 14, 2012 6:01 AM CST
I think I would kill (something) to successfully get rid of climbers! Kiwis grow here. Do they grow where you are?
Name: Mary Stella
Anchorage, AK (Zone 4b)
Peonies Ponds Dahlias Canning and food preservation Lilies Permaculture
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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Oberon46
Jun 17, 2012 10:05 AM CST
Yes they do. Mine got set back badly last year by mice gnawing on it though. I just had three raised beds put in (4x8x18") and will be putting heavy duty posts on the north end (4') of each. Then heavy duty grid of fence material attached. I read that I can then get my squash, zuchinni, cucumbers to climb up them. For the heavier fruits you attach nylon bags to take the weight off the stem. Will see how that works.

Right now I am mixing up soil for the top of one box: 1/3 each compost, peat moss, vermiculite. Using 5 different kinds of compost per the books instructions. I want to see if that makes an appreciable difference in the growth.
"What a person needs in gardening is a cast iron back with a hinge in it" Charles Dudley Warner (spelling edited by Dinu lol)

Charter ATP Member
hazelnut
Jun 17, 2012 6:20 PM CST
when I mix soil I use and equal mix of fine pinebark mulch, perlite, and peat moss. Over the years it accumulates and makes a high quality garden soil.

Pantyhose --cut in two make great ties for tomatoes and other fruits you want to attach to stakes or vertical fences to make them climb.
Name: Mary Stella
Anchorage, AK (Zone 4b)
Peonies Ponds Dahlias Canning and food preservation Lilies Permaculture
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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Oberon46
Jun 17, 2012 9:30 PM CST
Sounds good. About what I end up with. Filled the top 6" of my raised bed
"What a person needs in gardening is a cast iron back with a hinge in it" Charles Dudley Warner (spelling edited by Dinu lol)
Name: Chris Powell
Glendale, AZ (Zone 9b)
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milkmood
Jun 20, 2012 10:21 AM CST
I just strung up some grapes, some small hops vines (from Oikos) on a fence, and some fast growing morning glory. The morning glory is on my shed...if I can get it to cover the west facing wall, maybe it will help keep the shed cooler in summer afternoons.
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
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dave
Jun 20, 2012 10:50 AM CST

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With supports I'd bet that hops would cover a shed wall with no trouble.

Charter ATP Member
hazelnut
Jun 21, 2012 5:30 AM CST
In the Southeast we have a perennial vine called Smilax. It is a good climber, does not damage walls, and the local women's clubs always use it for decorating the antebellum houses for Christmas. However, local insurance companies and the Forestry service are discouraging people from planting vines against buildings because they are a fire hazard. For sure, I once had a flare-up with my flame weed eater. I was trying to kill some ivy groundcover which was also growing up a nearby tree. In minutes the whole 200 ft tree was aflame. Ivy is not a fire resistant plant. Im sure annual vines in a tended area which has water would be less of a hazaard.

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