Beekeeping forum: Honey bee Diseases

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Name: Margaret
Delta KY
I'm A Charley's Girl For Sure
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Beekeeper
Seed Starter Permaculture Region: Kentucky Garden Ideas: Master Level
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Mindy03
Apr 30, 2011 6:16 AM CST

Moderator

Honey bees are subject to disease just like all other living organisms. Here is six of them.

American Foulbrood
Caused by a spore forming bacterium
No cure once it occurs but can be prevented by treating with antibiotics in spring and autumn.
Spores can live in equipment for 70 years.
Affects larvae and pupae

European Foulbrood
Caused by a spore forming bacterium
Not as serious as Amercian Foulbrood because the spores do not live as long. A colony can recover from this one on their own sometimes. Prevent by treating with antibiotics in spring and autumn as for American Foulbrood
Affects larvae

Nosema
A protozoan disease
This disease is sort of like dysentery in humans
Most commin in spring after the bees have been confined for the winter
Usually disappears once they are out and bringing in nectar.
Prevent by locating the hive in a dry, sunny or dappled sun location with good air flow and fresh, clean water nearby
Affects adult bees

Chalkbrood
Caused by a fungus
Most common during wet, cold springs
No treatment neccesary; the bees will recover on their own and clear the dead larvae out themselves. You can help speed the removal up by checking the frames and removing any you see for them. And by removing any mummified carcasses from the bees "front porch" and the ground near the hive.
Affects larvae

Sacbrood
Caused by a virus
This is sort of like a common cold in humans
No treatment needed but you can help your hive by removing any brood affected
Affects brood

Stonebrood
Caused by a fungus
This is a rare occurance and the hive can recover from it on their own. You can help by removing the mummified carcasses from the hive and from around the outside of the hive.
Affects larvae and pupae

There are other viruses and diseases that affect bees but these are the most serious ones.
The news is full of Colony Collapse Disorder which is where the bees suddently abandon the hive for reasons not yet understood. There is alot of research going on in various areas to determine the cause of this.


Name: Jerry
Rio Rancho, New Mexico (Zone 7b)
Region: Texas Beekeeper Bee Lover Region: United States of America Plays in the sandbox
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jamyers59
Apr 28, 2012 10:29 PM CST
I realize this is not disease relatedbut, I have heard a new theory concerning the amazingly large loss of honey bees in the last few years is the use of Plywood in making some hives. It's said that the Formaldehyde used in making Plywood is killing the bees...Ya think? I also think a few folks may have even mistakenly use pressure treated lumber in their construction. Thumbs down
Up to my elbows in the dirt while being on top of the dirt is a great day!
Name: Margaret
Delta KY
I'm A Charley's Girl For Sure
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Beekeeper
Seed Starter Permaculture Region: Kentucky Garden Ideas: Master Level
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Mindy03
Apr 29, 2012 6:37 AM CST

Moderator

HI Jerry. I did some research on your question and find no definite answer to it. Some sites say the glue used to make plywood may emit gases over time but also says there's no research on whether the bees tendency to coat the inside of the hive with propolis reduces that or not.

Personally I don't think non pressure treated plywood is a big contributing factor to the loss of bees. I believe it is a combination of factors such as how healthy the bees are, how much stress they are under and how healthy the environment they forage is.

I wouldn't use plywood to build a hive myself. Cypress, cedar, beech and oak woods would be much better and last longer.

Also, honey bees won't live in anything that is seriously hazardous to them. They seal all cracks no matter how tiny we think they are with propolis which guards against viruses and bacteria. Some studies have shown thaty even use propolis to seal off unsafe honey in the hive.

Katem
Jan 1, 2014 4:55 PM CST
Are any of your contributors interested in encouraging wild bees, such as Mason bees - spring blue orchard bees, osmia lignaria. They are considered to be more efficient pollinators than honey bees and are useful in orchards and crop fields as well as gardens. katem





Name: Margaret
Delta KY
I'm A Charley's Girl For Sure
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Beekeeper
Seed Starter Permaculture Region: Kentucky Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
Mindy03
Jan 1, 2014 5:15 PM CST

Moderator

A lot of ATP gardeners are interested in providing for all types of pollinators not just honey bees.

If you would like to discuss the other types of bees feel free to start a forum on the subject.

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