A Quick Tomato Tip: Great gardening inspiration ~ thanks!

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A Quick Tomato Tip

By wildflowers
June 30, 2012

To have a supply of fresh home grown tomatoes into fall and until the first frost, you might want to consider planting some new plants now (July). If you have a long enough growing season, plant transplants, cuttings from existing plants or from seed. When your spring plants are done producing, the summer plantings will just be starting!

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Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
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pod
Jun 29, 2012 6:37 PM CST
Already have the fall maters germinating.

I haven't tried cuttings but in the past, I have cut back plants and let them regrow for fall.

Tough, tough heat so this seasons' germination is faltering.

I think if there was a good farmers market in striking distance, I'd quit gardening. lol Kristi
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jun 30, 2012 5:39 AM CST
Thank you, Pod!

I just began my fall plantings too. Some years it works, but I always try. Ha! Seeds seem to germinate and grow more quickly when things are all warmed up... but you're so right about the heat!

Maters don't like it too hot do they! Unless you get lucky and find a good heirloom variety that grows well in hot conditions.

I've never tried cutting the plants way back... thinking about giving it a try. Thanks. Thumbs up
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Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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pod
Jun 30, 2012 5:48 AM CST
I know folks that nurse their tomato plants through to the fall season but between drought, bugs and heat I don't think it is worth my effort. If you cut them back, be sure to leave some foliage.

When folks say it is too hot for new tomato plants, they are just wrong. The only time the heat affects them is when the bloom needs pollinating. In this climate if I start them in June and get them in ground by the end of July they will take off and grow like crazy. They begin to bloom about the time the night temps start to cool which is just right for pollination. I am sure you have found similar timing.

Can you (or anyone else) recommend a good heirloom variety for heat? I keep trying different ones each season and have not found one I'm taken with yet. Kristi
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jun 30, 2012 9:11 AM CST
I'm still trying to find a favorite myself.

Hope to see some recommendations from others! Thumbs up

This year Black Ethiopian is looking good. It produces well and the fruit is meaty with a nice balance of flavor between tangy and sweet. It's holding up very nicely so far, looking real good and going strong. This is my first time growing this variety.

Homestead usually does pretty good too; it's been quite prolific this year but has slowed down the past week or two.
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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
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Weedwhacker
Jun 30, 2012 9:24 AM CST
LOL, I could only wish we had a long enough growing season to need to start a 2nd crop of tomato plants -- late fall is when we get most of our tomatoes! Hilarious!
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Name: Kelly
Simpsonville, SC
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KLStuart
Jun 30, 2012 11:41 AM CST
I've never tried this, but if you can do it in Texas, it might work here! Thanks for the tip!
Name: Mary
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MaryE
Jun 30, 2012 1:56 PM CST
I wish I could do this. My growing season is just too short. I start plants in the greenhouse, set them out when I think it won't frost again (early June), and am lucky to have some ripe ones before having to pick the green ones to ripen in the house when fall frost is eminent. I try to cover them but it's not always possible.
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chelle
Jul 2, 2012 8:37 AM CST
I grow all heirlooms now, except for a few that volunteer year after year. Those volunteers are just showing now, but they're growing quickly. They're cherry tomatoes and romas, and usually start producing a few weeks before my big tomatoes...in mid-to-late August. So, these might be good choices to try direct-sowing late. My season isn't suitable for late cuttings from the big tomatoes; I've tried it. I have no luck ripening green tomatoes indoors, either. Hilarious! All I seem to end up with is gnats in the house. Green tomatoes here have to get pickled and canned.
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Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jul 2, 2012 12:48 PM CST
chelle said:I grow all heirlooms now, except for a few that volunteer year after year. Those volunteers are just showing now, but they're growing quickly. They're cherry tomatoes and romas, and usually start producing a few weeks before my big tomatoes...in mid-to-late August. So, these might be good choices to try direct-sowing late.


Good info, Chelle! Thanks!

I usually grow all heirlooms too but I must admit, I'm very fond of my volunteers that show up every year, before the others, and have a long growing season! Mine are cherry tomatoes too. Maybe romas next year, since I grew some this year for the first time. They acted like determinates and are already finished!
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

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