Vegetables and Fruit forum: Radishes all tops

Page 1 of 3 • 1 2 3
Views: 1354, Replies: 40 » Jump to the end
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 2, 2013 7:51 PM CST
Does anyone know why radishes get all tops and no radish? It wasn't too hot and they were planted on a "root" day according to the bio-dynamics planting calendar. My only guess would be too much nitrogen in the soil? If you have any other ideas, I'd appreciate hearing them. This has stumped my mother since my dad always grew such nice radishes.
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
chelle
Mar 3, 2013 4:52 PM CST
I've had this happen if they weren't thinned enough.
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 3, 2013 5:11 PM CST
Interesting. That's a new one. I'll tell my mother. Thanks!
Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
A bit of this and a bit of that
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Herbs
Composter Container Gardener Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
bitbit
Mar 4, 2013 7:41 PM CST
Overcrowding (as Chelle mentioned), heavy soil, and insufficient/uneven watering can all cause radishes not to form good roots. You're right that too much nitrogen in comparison to other nutrients (primarily phosphorous) can encourage leafy growth as well.

For your next attempt, try working some compost into the beds a few weeks before you plant, then mulching once the plant tops are large enough not to be covered. Those two things will help with soil texture, water retention, and nutrient balance... the spacing of the plants you'll still need to take care of, either by seeding further apart or thinning aggressively.
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 4, 2013 7:46 PM CST
Well, it's not heavy soil, she has the sandy soil common in northern Mi. But the watering could be part of it too. I'll let her know. She will appreciate the responses. She's close to 86 and still gardening strong! Maybe I'll make some seed tape for her so they will be spaced so she won't have to worry about that part.

Thanks, for the input. Thumbs up
Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
A bit of this and a bit of that
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Herbs
Composter Container Gardener Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
bitbit
Mar 4, 2013 8:55 PM CST
I grow in sand, too. It really is perfect for root crops texture-wise, but at least around here, requires a lot of amending because it just doesn't hold onto water or nutrients. Mulch with something that will break down in a season and you're preparing for the next crop while this crop grows Thumbs up
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 4, 2013 9:00 PM CST
Well, it's my mother's garden and I am having a tough time trying to get her to understand the need for compost and mulch and unfortunately, she's in MI. and I'm in GA. But I'll remind her since she did ask what to do! Big Grin

I, on the other hand have clay. We have been amending and each year I get one row (3x50) for root crops so I will add extra sand, vermiculite, compost and work it in good. I got some really nice carrots and parsnips this year so it must be working! Beets were a bust though Confused
Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
A bit of this and a bit of that
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Herbs
Composter Container Gardener Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
bitbit
Mar 4, 2013 9:18 PM CST
Yeah, I caught that in your previous reply and still kept the second-person pronouns. I'll blame a sleepy brain, it's been a long day. Whistling I can only hope I'm gardening strong when I'm her age! I just turned 30, and my bum knee is already making me feel like an old hen destined for the soup pot Blinking

I'm sure there are other things that could help, but I find that mulch and compost are two things that a garden can never have too much of, particularly on nutrient-poor sand. I can't imagine gardening without them. I may be a bit overzealous - I will compost just about anything and use about half as many things as mulch, sometimes well outside the conventional wisdom. So far, my plants don't complain.
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 4, 2013 9:26 PM CST
Thumbs up
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
Image
RickCorey
Mar 5, 2013 6:47 PM CST
I tried Daikon radishes one year, probably too early or too c old (or something else wrong). The roots were TINY, but I let them grow and bloom (very pretty). The tons of radish pods were delicious!

Next year, I got a few roots 6-8" long ... but much too hot for me.

P.S.
>> add extra sand, vermiculite, compost and work it in good

Can't beat lots of compost! I'm a big fan of pine bark, or any evergreen bark. For softening clay soil, I like well shredded bark fines. It's like peat moss, but provides loft for 2-3 years instead of 4-5 months.

For aeration, small bark nuggets.
For top-dress mulch, large bark nuggets or wood chips.

Whatever bark product I buy, I screen it, and then use the different sizes in different ways. I even use it for potting mix and seed-starting mix.

[Last edited by RickCorey - Mar 5, 2013 6:54 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #368043 (10)
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 5, 2013 6:52 PM CST
Aren't they using Daikons also for breaking up clay soil now? I have never tried them.

I made seed tapes today for my mother so at least she shouldn't have to thin them. She said she would add compost and mulch. Hopefully she'll have better luck this year Thumbs up
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
Image
RickCorey
Mar 5, 2013 7:11 PM CST
>> Aren't they using Daikons also for breaking up clay soil now?

Yes, that and "tillage radishes". That is the main reason I bought Daikon radishes: the thought of roots penetrating 18" into my heavy clay was exciting. I figured the radishes would need jackhammers or dynamite, and might keep me up all night with the hammering. Like Daikon fracking.

Instead the roots were only a few inches long.
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 5, 2013 7:48 PM CST
Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing

No sleepless nights then at least!

Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
Image
RickCorey
Mar 5, 2013 8:22 PM CST
Slept like a baby.

It is humbling to read about these wonder-radi9shes that can break up "the hardest clay soils" ... then plant them in one of my AMENDED beds and have them fizzle out and give up.

we4ll, I knew I needed about 5 times as much compost and lots more of everything else as well.

I wish I could swap about 10 cubic yards of clay for some Florida sandy subsoil!
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 5, 2013 9:18 PM CST
Is yours that gray sticky clay like Michigan? We have the RED clay here. It was so strange when I first moved here. Everytime I took pictures to post all my friends said they couldn't get used to seeing the red clay. Most of my beds are not quite so red now but we've only been amending for two years so they still have a ways to go.

I just thought they were the new "miracle plant" that was going to help break up this stuff. What's the point if you have to amend the soil to get them to grow?

We just keep dumping the composted horse manure and growing clover and buckwheat. But I have to double amend my root crop row every year since we rotate the 20 rows every year. On year three...

I actually tried to grow peanuts last year...you know, GA, peanuts. What was I thinking? I guess there are a few sandy spots but they certainly aren't any where near us! Hilarious!
Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
A bit of this and a bit of that
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Herbs
Composter Container Gardener Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
bitbit
Mar 5, 2013 9:25 PM CST
Ugh, I grew up on that red clay, with shale less than a foot below the surface. It was so miserable to dig in, let alone try to grow anything. I wish I had some advice... we got a truckload of topsoil delivered when we redid the gardens at that house so we could avoid dealing with the clay completely.
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Mar 5, 2013 10:01 PM CST
My daughter's in MI and that's what she does instead of trying to amend. Not that she can't, but she's always IN A HURRY! She'll learn. But I've gotta say, her flowers look a heck of a lot better than mine ever have!

I grow most of my stuff at my son's and he's really big into amending and building the soil. It's just s o o o o s s l l o o w w
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
Mar 6, 2013 11:34 AM CST
When I did my back-yard landscape two years ago, I knew it was way more than I wanted to tackle at my age and so I hired a commercial landscape outfit to do he work. The landscape was to be approximately 10 ft deep and 150 ft wide. In central and northeast Mississippi, we have what's called Yazoo clay, and this clay sits approximately 2" below my "topsoil" and grass, and is literally 10 ft deep! When it is wet, a shovel-full weighs in at 25 lbs and when it is dry, it is like concrete. So you see the reason why I hired this job out. The landscape company brought in two huge backhoes, a huge tiller, and a trencher to do the job. Of the 12 workers, 5 had shovels in hand, four had pitch-forks, and 3 had wheelbarrows. The project took five days and I don't think they made a cent of profit on the work! They had to dig out clay four feet down and it filled two dump-trucks. They brought in two dump-trucks full of "garden soil" and then a dump-truck full of cypress mulch. I think they put in around 50 plants. So far, due to all their hard work and ammending every square inch of planted soil, everything is still growing well. Ken
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
Image
RickCorey
Mar 6, 2013 2:30 PM CST
>> I just thought they were the new "miracle plant" that was going to help break up this stuff. What's the point if you have to amend the soil to get them to grow?

My theory is that what farmers call "heavy soil" is already so good that I would kill for a few yards of it. (Well, not kill for it, but at least envy and drool.) What I call heavy clay, they would laugh at and say: "Yeah, right, don't even TRY to farm THERE!"

Mine is only gray in a few places where it i extra-pure. The average rock-hard stuff is dark brown. I assume that means its only 70-80% literal clay particles.

My approach is to make a raised bed with 6-10" of amended soil that is merely "very heavy clay" soil. I amend with com post, bark fines, crushed rock etc. Then I try to add enough m ore compost every year to keep the top layer light enough to be live soil and support plants.

But first I assure that another 6-12" of clay UNDER the floor of my raised bed is graded down to some trench that runs downhill. To the extent that the clay layer "perks", it will drain and let air in to whatever microscopic pores exist. That way, roots and worms and leached compost can get into it SLOOOWLY.

This way, roots, worms and organics will gradually deepen my root zone. Years f4om now, the original clay might be only 15-25% of the soil in and under my raised beds. I fear that I will still have a small hill of excavated clay waiting for more compost or cover crop roots to penetrate it..

In theory, and if I had more sunny spots, I could grade my clay hills, amend an inch or two of the surface, then plant crops like clover or alfalfa that DO have little jackhammer roots for breaking up clay. Keep adding organic matter, and in a few years I might have 6" of soil good enough to allow cover crops on a wider area.
Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
A bit of this and a bit of that
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Herbs
Composter Container Gardener Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
bitbit
Mar 6, 2013 3:53 PM CST
Georgia is probably sandy near the coast, at least that's how Virginia is. It's amazing how different things are within a single state (and not even a very big one!). I grew up on the edge of the Appalachian foothills, with heavy red clay and shale, and in zone six where we got at least a few significant snows each winter. Now I'm on the coast, with nearly pure sand, and in zone eight where frosts are infrequent. There's barely 200 miles between the two!

Page 1 of 3 • 1 2 3

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Vegetables and Fruit forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Dianthus 'Nyewood Cream'"