Plumeria forum: Question:

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Name: Online public--Cyra
Central CA (Zone 9a)
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cyra
Apr 7, 2013 12:46 PM CST
A site member mentioned grafted plants in a conversation, and I wondered about that, what is the purpose behind grafting plumeria plants as opposed to growing rooted cuttings? I can see where if you wanted to save space and wanted differently-colored plumeria flowers on the same tree, but you'd have to know the growth habit of each graft-parent I think, or you could end up with a seriously lop-sided plumeria....
Is the purpose of grafting to have a plant with a root system? Are cuttings grafted to a rooted plumeria? I've wondered about this, and I've heard that a gentleman at FC, (who sadly is no longer with us) would graft plants for people, so I'm sure there's a good reason for doing so. Why do people graft plumeria, other than to maybe save varieties?
Thanks.
Name: Peg
Va.Beach (Zone 8a)
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pcput
Apr 7, 2013 5:20 PM CST
Cyra, I'll see if I can help here until others jump in. Some variates are difficult to root so grafting makes it more likely to end up with that variety, especially with someone as skilled as Luc at FC was. I had a 5 tip cutting that I tried all winter (not the best time to try) to root. In spring I sent it to Luc and he successfully made 3 plants out of it. The cutting could not be replaced so this way two of my friends and I now have this plant. A seller could make more plants available quicker if they are grafted instead of rooting them. Of course this is the only way to make the "Rainbow" trees and like you said, choice of which ones you use should be considered, both in growth, bloom time,and branching. Some people don't like the look of the graft but it can be buried if it is close to the ground. I have some and I can't say I mind. It gives them a one of a kind look. Peg
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Apr 8, 2013 7:15 AM CST

Moderator

I would like to add that a grafted plant has a much sturdier root system right off the bat, and will make for a more vigorous plant.
I am a great fan of grafted plants.
And by the way, Carol at Florida Colors is the new grafting queen! I have seen her at work and I think she was holding back when Luc was alive... she is his equal when it comes to grafting! And yes, they will still do custom grafts.
There is an Open House at Florida Colors on May 18th - maybe you want to consider going? It will be fun! Plus there will be 'too big to ship' plants for sale.....
Name: Online public--Cyra
Central CA (Zone 9a)
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cyra
Apr 8, 2013 9:46 AM CST
Thank you both, I think I understand the purpose of grafting a bit better, now, from what you've both (as well as another site member) explained.. It's done to save rare cuttings, hard-to-root cuttings, and to provide a cutting the benefits of a healthy and vigorous root system. So, what I'm thinking is this...even if after 4 + years my crop of seedlings does not produce any exceptional plumeria, it may still serve as grafting stock, providing it's healthy. Or are particular(ly vigorous) varieties more suitable as graft stock?
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Apr 8, 2013 10:23 AM CST

Moderator

I agree and really, they all do well as grafting stock.

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