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Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jun 27, 2010 10:04 AM CST
I planted some comfrey near my tomato plants because it's supposed to help with production and overall health of the tomatoes. Also, I know that you can take some of the leaves and fill up a 5 gal container, then add water, let it soak (outside!!) until it's "ripe" and then use the liquid as a fertilizer for your tomatoes. You can also put the old leaves on top of the dirt/mulch around your tomato plants and as it breaks down, the beneficial nutrients will leach down into your soil. As of yet, I've not been able to try any of this out because my plant only has about 5 leaves on it! Thought I'd share with you, though.

Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jun 27, 2010 12:24 PM CST

Moderator

Thank you for posting all the interesting tidbits about comfrey. It seems to be quite an amazing plant.

I have yet to grow comfrey myself but don't be discouraged about the growth of your comfrey plant yet. It looks very healthy. I am guessing that it is an heirloom seed variety. I say that because I have found that many heirloom seeds take their time growing, probably naturally putting all of their energy into making a strong root system. I've noticed plants in the wild do the same thing, sprouts sit forever it seems and then all of the sudden they just explode. I'm guessing it will take off and flourish when it's ready. Whistling
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jun 27, 2010 1:15 PM CST
As long as it survives the winter and comes back next year, I'll be happy. Or, if it blooms and I can save the seeds, that'll work, too.

It probably is an heirloom variety, but I don't remember and I'd have to go dig through my seeds from this year to find out! LOL
Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jul 10, 2010 7:08 PM CST
Found this on another site and thought it might be helpful to some folks here.

http://www.organicgardening.com/featureprint/1,7759,s1-3-81-...
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Garden Procrastinator Herbs Vegetable Grower Plant Identifier
Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Composter Houseplants
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gardengus
Jul 10, 2010 7:53 PM CST
Comfrey is also a favorite of bees when in bloom , and great goat food, all the nutrients found in the leaves are good for the goats and they produce great fertilizer in return.

Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jul 11, 2010 5:36 AM CST

Moderator

Thank you for the great site, Stephanie!

Cinda, that's a very nice picture of comfrey!!

On top of all the great things about it, I think it is a lovely plant that would look very nice included in the garden!
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jul 11, 2010 10:54 AM CST
Mine has really taken off since we've had all the rain in the past couple of weeks! I'm not sure I'm going to tell the DH that it has a 6' long root, though! LOL
Name: leaflady
planet earth
Love the sinner, hate the sin
Charter ATP Member
leaflady
Jul 11, 2010 4:04 PM CST
I've had comfrey for years and it is invasive here is we aren't careful. I have to admit I don't use it much except in a salve or oil I make for sores each year. I use equal parts torn up large leaf plantain and comfrey in hot olive oil. Allow to cool, remove leaves and drain them off into the oil well. If you want salve, reheat the oil and add some beeswax.

I think comfrey is a beautiful plant. I need to get some of mine moved into a more prominent place. It was in a raised bed that Holly removed for me last summer.

Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Garden Procrastinator Herbs Vegetable Grower Plant Identifier
Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Composter Houseplants
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gardengus
Jul 11, 2010 5:31 PM CST
Did you have trouble getting all the root out ? I have heard once it is planted It is almost impossible to remove.
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jul 11, 2010 6:24 PM CST

Moderator

the article about comfrey Stephanie posted above mentions that. Says that comfrey can sprout from the severed roots and multiply. Blinking
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Garden Procrastinator Herbs Vegetable Grower Plant Identifier
Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Composter Houseplants
Image
gardengus
Jul 11, 2010 7:41 PM CST
I have never seen it growing wild around here? wonder why.
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jul 12, 2010 5:58 AM CST

Moderator

I find it interesting that I am reading that comfrey is relatively easy to grow but, my usual seed source has it priced three-X's the usual herb cost and lists it as "Very difficult to germinate." They're up in Virginia but I don't know why it would be so hard to germinate Confused
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Garden Procrastinator Herbs Vegetable Grower Plant Identifier
Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Composter Houseplants
Image
gardengus
Jul 12, 2010 7:12 AM CST
I have never had any just pop up from seed although I usually cut it back before the seeds have time to mature.
My original start was root from a friend of my sister .I have sent several root/plant starts to people but never tried it from seed.
Wonder if someone in seed sowing would know or have ever started it?
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jul 12, 2010 4:13 PM CST

Moderator

Thank you Cinda,

that's a good idea to start the topic up over there. Smiling
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jul 12, 2010 5:52 PM CST
I sowed 10 seeds this past winter in my winter sowing endeavor and only 2 germinated. Not sure what that means, but not a very good germination rate.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jul 12, 2010 6:36 PM CST

Moderator

Hmmm... Well I know it wasn't you Stephanie because you have great success growing from seed from what I've seen~especially wintersowing!! I'm guessing they really are just difficult to germinate. It seems to contradict their invasive status, in comparison to many others.

Sooo I will have to look around. the article you posted talked about a certain kind of comfrey, I'll go back and see and go from there.

Thank you all.
Christine
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jul 12, 2010 6:43 PM CST
I wonder if you try soaking them in hydrogen peroxide if that would help the germination rate?? Don't have personal experience doing that with comfrey, but it might help.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
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wildflowers
Jul 12, 2010 6:47 PM CST

Moderator

Yes, peroxide has been successful in helping difficult seeds to germinate. Good advise.

thanks a bunch.

When I actually get the seeds planted, I will report on my success Smiling
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Stephanie
Fort Worth, TX (8a)
Charter ATP Member Cat Lover Region: Texas Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Region: United States of America
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stephanietx
Jul 14, 2010 6:29 AM CST
You could also try to nick some prior to soaking. It would be interesting to see what the germination rate would be between ones that were nicked & soaked vs. the ones that were just soaked.

Here's my little baby as of yesterday. It's gotten bigger, but is being overshadowed by the tomato plants growing nearby.



Thumb of 2010-07-14/stephanietx/b6efbf
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
The WITWIT Badge Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Birds Bee Lover
Dragonflies Herbs Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Composter Hummingbirder
Image
wildflowers
Jul 14, 2010 7:00 AM CST

Moderator

Yes, I can try that. The sad part is, I ended up ordering from my usual source and they were offering 5 seeds, yes FIVE seeds for $3.50!! So I have five seeds coming. hahaha

I thought that was rather steep but the other places I looked for comfrey seeds said they were sold out for this year.

Five seeds? that is just crazy Blinking
I really, really hope they do germinate.

Yours is looking good and so is your tomato plant. The tomato can end up a huge plant for sure... but it'll be gone at the end of the season, hopefully after it produces a bunch!!!

May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

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