Vegetables and Fruit forum: fall gardening

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JuicinJackie
Aug 22, 2013 6:43 AM CST
Hi... I am trying a fall garden for the first time. I found 2 links that pertain to my area, Eugene, Oregon, but the information is not the same, specifically, when to sow seeds outdoors and when to start them indoors. I am very new to this and am confused. Can you help me? Thank you. Jackie

On this one

http://garden.org/apps/calendar/?q=97402 it says:

Most tomatoes, peppers and eggplants, for example, require around 100 days to harvest, therefore you'd want to transplant those into the ground around July 11.

Fall is the time to plant garlic. Around September 4, take your cloves apart and plant the toes about 3 inches deep.

Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage can be direct seeded into your garden around August 10, but because of the heat during that time of year, it's better to start them indoors around June 21 and then transplant them into the garden around July 31. Do the same with lettuce and spinach.

Sow peas directly around August 5.

Now, for all the usual hot weather veggies like beans, cowpeas, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, gourds and sunflowers, you should plant those seeds directly into the ground around July 6.


On this one

http://garden.org/apps/calendar/?q=Eugene,%20OR it says:

Most tomatoes, peppers and eggplants, for example, require around 100 days to harvest, therefore you'd want to transplant those into the ground around January 1.

Fall is the time to plant garlic. Around January 1, take your cloves apart and plant the toes about 3 inches deep.

Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage can be direct seeded into your garden around August 22, but because of the heat during that time of year, it's better to start them indoors around August 22 and then transplant them into the garden around January 1. Do the same with lettuce and spinach.

Sow peas directly around August 22.

Now, for all the usual hot weather veggies like beans, cowpeas, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, gourds and sunflowers, you should plant those seeds directly into the ground around August 23.
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
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dave
Aug 22, 2013 7:09 AM CST

Garden.org Admin

Hi JuicinJackie, thanks for this report. You found a bug in our system that I have now fixed. This was happening because we didn't complete frost information for Eugene, OR. I'll be updating the system a little more in response to your inquiry here. In the meantime you can check those links and see that their numbers are correct.

JuicinJackie
Aug 22, 2013 8:29 AM CST
thank you!

JuicinJackie
Aug 22, 2013 8:37 AM CST
Dave, I have a few more questions....

I have a raised bed (3 high cement block frame), that gets sun all day long. (south and north exposure). Going by the dates that turn out to be incorrect, I was planning on planting corn, bush cukes, okra and muskmelons in it. If I put a "greenhouse" over the bed (pvc hoop and plastic), do you think I could entice these warm weather crops to grow before frost (typically around October 19)? Thank you! Jackie
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
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Newyorkrita
Aug 23, 2013 10:31 AM CST
Okra and any types of melons are heat lovers so I would say no. Skip planting them for this year.

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