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The Benefits of Deadheading

By Calif_Sue
August 24, 2013

Deadheading your roses (and other perennials) during the summer months not only keeps them looking tidy, but also encourages more bloom and helps to extend the growing season. In the fall, I let the roses go to seed to set hips.

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Name: Charlie
Aurora, Ontario (Zone 5b)
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SunnyBorders
Aug 24, 2013 11:01 AM CST
Re other perennials and deadheading.

In addition to tidiness and encouraging more bloom, deadheading prevents/limits reseeding around perennials like musk mallow and rose campion.
Deadheading, and gradually cutting back after blooming, also enhances air flow around summer perennials like garden phlox and false sunflower.
Name: Renée
Northern KY
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KyWoods
Aug 24, 2013 6:20 PM CST
How late in the year should I continue to deadhead roses? It's still in the 80's here during the day, but starting to cool off at night.
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
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Calif_Sue
Aug 24, 2013 9:51 PM CST

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I continue deadheading as long as my roses are still growing and producing blooms. In my zone, I can even have blooms into Nov. and Dec. Less sunlight/shorter days and freezing temps will stop growth and freeze any buds.
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Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
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RoseBlush1
Aug 24, 2013 10:19 PM CST
I live in the mountains of northern California. I'll probably have one more full flush of roses, but I stop dead heading around the first of October because I want the roses to set seed and harden off for winter. I'll still get blooms until the first frost, which may not arrive until mid-November.

In my climate, the day temps can go from the low 90s down to the 50s within a couple of days and night temps drop just as dramatically. I don't want to encourage new growth going into winter. Besides, the hips on some roses are simply beautiful in the winter garden.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Renée
Northern KY
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KyWoods
Aug 25, 2013 7:34 PM CST
Thanks! I am taking care of an elderly friend's garden and she has some very old roses, some of which were brought over from Germany. I don't want to do anything that might be detrimental to them.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Aug 25, 2013 8:18 PM CST
How very kind of you.

Blessings and good luck with helping your friend.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Renée
Northern KY
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Kentucky Sempervivums Cat Lover Dog Lover
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
KyWoods
Aug 26, 2013 7:00 AM CST
Thanks, and thank you for the acorns! Smiling

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