Get the Most out of Your Swiss Chard: A very resilient plant

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Get the Most out of  Your Swiss Chard

By wildflowers
September 30, 2013

Cut your Swiss chard back in late summer and it will resprout, growing new leaves for a fall harvest and well into the winter.

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Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
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bitbit
Sep 29, 2013 6:52 PM CST
Yes, I find that I can cut my chard nearly to the ground anytime it's looking ragged, and it will come back as strong as ever. In my climate, the roots will survive winter without protection, but frost will leave the foliage very sad-looking, so I can cut them back in spring and get another meal before my new plants are big enough to harvest.
Name: Maridell
Sioux City IA (Zone 4b)
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Maridell
Oct 1, 2013 3:50 PM CST
Any special (and easy) recipes? I have a plant and unsure how to use...I have cut back a few times but so far have not used it, just sitting there adding color to the garden lol.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Oct 1, 2013 5:06 PM CST
Hi Maridell,

My hubby introduced me to Swiss chard! I think it's yummy. I think the best way to try it is with a simple saute. Make sure you cook it the same day you harvest so that you can get it tasting its very best. Just like anything that tastes so much better straight from the garden! I'm not really very good with exact recipes, so bare with me.

After washing the leaves, I usually remove the leaves from the stalks. Cut the stalks into bite size pieces.

Melt on low-medium heat, a little olive oil and equal amout of butter in a stainless steel, or cast-iron saute pan. Add the stalk pieces and cook for 5 minutes. Cut the leaves in chunks. Mince a couple of garlic cloves and a shallot. Add them to the stalk pieces and stir. I usually add a little chicken stock or water (about 1/4 cup or enough to cover the bottom of the pan) but more often I like to add a little white wine Big Grin Salt and pepper to taste, stir it all and cover for another five minutes. Done. We usually drizzle a little splash of horseradish vinegar or peppadew juice, or just a squeeze of lemon will do. Enjoy!

After you have tasted them and find them so tasty, you can try them in so many other ways. Sometimes I like to add some chopped Canadian bacon to the mix.

It makes a delish quiche and fantastic pizza too!
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

[Last edited by wildflowers - Oct 1, 2013 5:09 PM (+)]
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Baltimore County, MD (Zone 7a)
A bit of this and a bit of that
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Herbs
Composter Container Gardener Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader
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bitbit
Oct 1, 2013 6:01 PM CST
What @wildflowers mentioned is pretty much how I make it if I'm having it on its own. Olive oil, garlic, a bit of broth or wine, and a big saute pan Big Grin

But you can do it a lot of other ways too. Pretty much anything that you'd do with spinach, you can also do with chard - top a pizza, add to a soup or pasta dish, make saag paneer (an Indian dish - my husband is expert at this, though I have to make the cheese for him), quiche, and so on. It has a stronger flavor than spinach (somewhat reminiscent of beets - they're actually the same species), so you might want to start out with recipes where it is more of a co-star until you're sure you like it.
Name: Maridell
Sioux City IA (Zone 4b)
enjoy the moment
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Maridell
Oct 1, 2013 8:24 PM CST
Thank you to both of you for sharing. I'll give it a try for sure!
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Oct 2, 2013 7:25 AM CST
I hope you will come back and tell us what you think.

The first time I tried them, my husband prepared them similar to above. I didn't think they would be anything special and thought I might have to make myself eat them to be "nice". I was surprised at how bright they tasted and the texture was like butter! With each bite, I like them even more and finished the bowl before I knew it.

And, it's full of 'good for you' vitamins and minerals! Thumbs up
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Maridell
Sioux City IA (Zone 4b)
enjoy the moment
Charter ATP Member Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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Maridell
Oct 4, 2013 11:08 AM CST
Back to report Smiling

Hubby is a bit of a picky eater so I made this today while he is at work. I was hungry for breakfast (late) so I decided to make an omelet. I sauteed the chard as suggested using garlic olive oil and then 5 min. of steaming. I prepared an omelet and slipped the swiss chard in (drained off liquid) added Parmesan let it melt a bit. I liked it. Nice crunch stays in the stems. Wish I had bacon - that would have been super yummy.

I will be honest that this veggie has a bit more "earthy" flavor than I am use to....but it has possibilities! Love that it is a good source of vits & mins.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Jan 9, 2014 7:35 AM CST
One of my favorite vegetables. I prepare it pretty much as described, usually add a dash of parmesan. And yes, it's wonderful in an omelet or frittata.
Name: Karen
NM , AZ (Zone 7b)
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plantmanager
Jan 16, 2016 1:09 PM CST
Sad to say, I've never had Swiss Chard! I am growing it now in my greenhouse, so hopefully I'll have some to try soon.
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