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Oct 3, 2013 1:18 PM CST
Can I grow some garlic in Rapid city, SD?
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
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Oct 3, 2013 1:45 PM CST
Yes, you can. I'm not sure if there are specific challenges for your area so you might want to check with your local extension office.
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
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Oct 3, 2013 1:48 PM CST Admin

There are lots of varieties that grow in extremely cold areas. @tinpins is the resident garlic expert.
Name: Alex Volker
Ames, IA (Zone 5a)
Cactus and Succulents
Oct 3, 2013 7:28 PM CST
You certainly should be able to, although I'm not sure when would be best to plant. I second checking with an extension office for the best information.
Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
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Oct 3, 2013 7:38 PM CST
Here in Utah I plant it in the fall.....right now would be a good time.
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
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Oct 4, 2013 9:01 PM CST
I live just west of Minneapolis, and I grow hardneck garlic types. They are the ones best adapted to northern climates, and better tasting with more complex flavoring, too. As for myself, I prefer the varieties that aren't so hot, as they allow the other flavors to shine more. Hardneck garlic generally has larger cloves but fewer per bulb, which make them easier to peel. I used to grow hundreds of bulbs each year and give them away to friends and neighbors, until the growing space was usurped by "more important" gardening endeavors. Now, even 5 years later, they still tell me how wonderful those yearly gifts were, and how dearly they are missed.

I had always planted the last week of September, and sometimes I would have significant emergence before winter, but it didn't seem to hurt them. But now, with the climate changing, our falls are consistently longer, and I now plant the first or second week of October.

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