Benefits of Mulching: This is a great article...

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Benefits of Mulching

By TBGDN
November 21, 2013

Mulch has many benefits when applied to certain perennials, vegetables, shrubs, and trees. In nature, mulch is formed and supplied generously by means of decaying plant litter, falling leaves and pine needles, and rotting trees. In the garden, we must help.

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Name: David Paul
(Zone 9b)
Cat Lover Hibiscus Seed Starter Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
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DavidofDeLand
Nov 22, 2013 7:57 AM CST
I have always adhered to using the bountiful leaves my huge Oaks produce. I blow them onto the driveways and chop them up with my little electric mulching mower and spread them. This way they are preset to speed up the decomposition factor and 'lock' themselves together so as not to easily blow out in the next windy day. Smiling

Thank you for sharing!

David
Name: Leon
Indiana (Zone 5a)
Light is the shadow of God!
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: United States of America Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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TBGDN
Nov 22, 2013 11:46 AM CST
David,
Thanks for your post. I also have several large white oaks and I use my bagger on the garden tractor for collecting them. They are already shredded; and all I have to do is spread them where they are needed. The winter snows here help in keeping them in place. Not only do they protect the soil from winds, but they attract earth worms and beneficial insects. In our blistering summers they help conserve moisture and keep the soil cooler at the base of the plants. In the decomposition process they provide nutrients to the soil and plants.

I use wheat straw from neighboring farms for the vegetable gardens, especially unstaked tomatoes and potato plants. Straw is a great amendment to sandy soils and is perfect for keeping soil off the tomatoes and peppers. In spring I simply rototill old straw into the soil. Below is an example of straw around tomatoes. And the second picture shows a mix of shredded leaves and pine needles; then the third shot is a hyacinth blooming in a layer of leaf/litter mulch. The last picture is at the edge of a lily garden where I spread a thick mat of shredded oak leaves.
Thumb of 2013-11-22/TBGDN/788117 Thumb of 2013-11-22/TBGDN/a1dfe5 Thumb of 2013-11-22/TBGDN/194d47 Thumb of 2013-11-22/TBGDN/11f4d4
This is a lesson I learned gradually over the years through trial and error. Mulching makes a huge difference (for me at least). Once again, thanks for your input.
Lux Umbra Dei
Name: David Paul
(Zone 9b)
Cat Lover Hibiscus Seed Starter Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Miniature Gardening Keeper of Poultry Herbs Foliage Fan Farmer Dragonflies
Image
DavidofDeLand
Nov 22, 2013 12:02 PM CST
You're welcome! I tip my hat to you.

Beautiful new pic's too. Smiling

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