Seeds forum: Ochna serrulata seeds

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Name: Blankspace
California
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Blankspace
Apr 4, 2014 4:27 PM CST
There isn't much information on these seeds. I thought I'd give a post a try. My aunts have a big shrub that seeds each year. I would get seeds from her and try to plant them. I don't know a fool proof method nor find one online.

Some say you need fresh seeds some say let them dry. What is best? I am not sure. What to do with them, not a clue.

What I've done so far was just stick the seeds in my camellia big 5gallon pot and cross fingers they sprout. Then I just repot then.

I will get seeds again from my aunts shrub again in august or so and try again. I started last year and the year before that. These plants are very slow growing.

The first year each plant had roughly 5-7 leaves. Right now with new leaves and those old 5-7 leaves fall off, it has another 4-5 leaves right now.

I need a lot of patients for this plant. Oddly my aunt can't seem to germinate the seeds that well. She was able to now have 3 plants that flowered but she gave up on trying to germinate. She just sprinkles the seeds around in her garden. She would dig them up and pot them but most times they don't survive.

This is a tricky plant that I haven't figured out yet.

Any tips or advice would be great on how to germinate these seeds. Thanks in advance.
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Rabbit Keeper Critters Allowed Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages
Herbs Region: Georgia Region: United States of America Native Plants and Wildflowers Dog Lover Composter
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greene
Apr 4, 2014 8:43 PM CST
I had not heard of this plant so I did a check on it. It's from Africa and is very slow growing. But after being introduced to Australia, it has become a weed since the seeds are dispersed by birds.

Serious answer:
That leads me to believe that something occurs during the digestion of the seeds that helps the seeds to germinate.
Someone may be along in a moment with the scientific name for that type of seed which relies on birds. Thumbs up

Not so serious answer:
Get a bird. Rolling on the floor laughing
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Claud
Water Valley, Ms (Zone 7b)
Charter ATP Member
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saltmarsh
Apr 4, 2014 10:03 PM CST
I don't have any experience with this plant, but hope this helps.

Link with some info for background. http://www.plantzafrica.com/plantnop/ochnaserrulat.htm

The link says it can be grown from fresh seeds or propagated from hardwood cuttings taken in June or July. This is what I would suggest. Get a 2 gallon black nursery pot and fill it with sharp sand. Take 12 - 8" cuttings from your Aunt's bush (wrap them in damp paper towels until you can get them home). Wet the sand until water stands on top. Allow the water to drain and add more sand and level it off with a stick. Remove all the leaves except the top 2 and cut 1/3 off the top 2. Wet the bottom end of the cuttings, shake off excess water, dip in rooting hormone and insert into the wet sand leaving 2" exposed. When all the cuttings are in the sand, cover the pot with a white opaque plastic grocery bag and fasten in place with string or wire. Set the pot in dappled shade (never in direct sunlight) and leave it alone for 2 months. After 2 months your should be able to see new growth on the cuttings through the bag. Use sissors to snip several vent holes just above the top of the pot. After another week snip more vents at the top of the bag. Finally after one more week, remove the bag lay the pot on its side and using a water hose gently wash the sand from the roots of your new plants. Muddy the roots as you separate them and pot them up so they can harden to their new environment. Claud
Name: Blankspace
California
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Blankspace
Apr 9, 2014 10:54 PM CST
I have never done cuttings before. I need to look up sharp sand. Does beach sand work instead? Hehe. I gotta buy sharp sand first. I also need to look up root hormone. Never used that before. What is the best kind and easiest to find in stores?

Can I use this method for all cuttings? Thanks in advance for the help.
Name: Claud
Water Valley, Ms (Zone 7b)
Charter ATP Member
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saltmarsh
Apr 10, 2014 12:32 AM CST
Blankspace said:I have never done cuttings before. I need to look up sharp sand. Does beach sand work instead? Hehe. I gotta buy sharp sand first. I also need to look up root hormone. Never used that before. What is the best kind and easiest to find in stores?

Can I use this method for all cuttings? Thanks in advance for the help.


Cuttings are easy and if you have a spot where they can sit undisturbed for a couple of months most will root with this method. What you want are pencil size cuttings (about 1/4 inch x 8 inches). a single slender branch can be made into 3 or 4 cuttings.

Sharp sand is used to make mortar and concrete. It has sharp edges on it because it hasn't been rubbed back and forth by the ocean for thousands of years. That's why beach sand feels good to walk in. It has smooth edges. The roughness of sharp sand provides a little more room for the roots to grow. If you go by a construction site with a sand pile they will probably give you a couple of buckets of sand for the asking. (or a buck)

I use Rootnone rooting hormone. It's a powder and can be found in the big box stores in the gardening section. Just follow the directions on the label.

Try it and surprize yourself. If you don't see leafy growth after a couple of months, remove the cuttings and start over. Just be sure to rewet the sand.

While you are waiting for the cuttings to root, try to decide where their permanent home will be. When you are ready to remove the cuttings from the sand take a couple of scoops of dirt from where they will be planted and add water to make a thin mud . Just drag the cuttings back and forth through the mud to coat all of the roots. This will keep the roots from drying and dying. Typically the cuttings should be planted at the same depth as they were in the rooting pot. Have fun, Claud.

Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Rabbit Keeper Critters Allowed Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages
Herbs Region: Georgia Region: United States of America Native Plants and Wildflowers Dog Lover Composter
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greene
Apr 10, 2014 5:17 AM CST
@Blankspace, you have plenty of time to gather supplies and do research as the cutting should be taken in June or July.
Oh, and no, please don't use the beach sand; just buy a bag. It only costs about $2-$3.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Blankspace
California
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Blankspace
Apr 13, 2014 3:02 PM CST
Oh no. I didn't remember that you said June or July. I did it today. I was just so excited to go out and try it. I bought coarse sand instead. I bought root hormone powder type. My dad cut me branches that are like almost 1 inch think. I tried it on a michelia alba tree. I haven't tried it on the ochna so I will wait until June for the ochna serrulata. My dad cut me 2 big branches. It looks like a 2 foot tall tree. Will it still root or should I go and fix it to make smaller cuttings from that big cutting? Eep.
Name: Claud
Water Valley, Ms (Zone 7b)
Charter ATP Member
Image
saltmarsh
Apr 13, 2014 6:56 PM CST
Small is good. Think pencil size. And don't be afraid to try the ochna serrulata now. The worst that can happen is you'll end up with a few dead twigs and you might end up 2 months ahead and have a pot full of new plants to set out or give away or both. Claud

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