Gingers: Gingers in Supermarkets

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Gingers

By drdawg
May 20, 2014

Gingers, also called "ginger lilies," make great landscape or patio plants. They are tolerant of temperature extremes, will grow in poor soil, and can even grow in those wet areas where little else will grow. Most species are grown for their beautiful, fragrant flowers, but there are varieties used as condiments and varieties used as natural shampoo/conditioner in Hawaii.

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Orlando, FLORIDA (Zone 9b)
Region: Florida
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OrlandoBill
May 24, 2014 10:27 AM CST
(From "Newbie") So, the ginger bought in a Super Market? What variety is this? Will it grow as well? Looks just like some of the Ginger Lilly roots my grandmother had in her garden.
Confused
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
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drdawg
May 24, 2014 12:06 PM CST
Ten years ago I could have given you an answer. Not now. Back then almost every single garlic sold in grocery stores were from Gilroy, CA (they call the town "The Garlic Capitol of the World"). It was going to be one of two varieties, though in reality, there is little if any difference in them. One was named "Early California" and the other "Late California". Catchy, huh. One was harvested early and.............well you know. Sticking tongue out

Now almost all the garlic seen outside of the Pacific-coast states is from China. Who knows what the variety is but it still looks like those two CA varieties. The Chinese (might) treat their garlic so that it will store longer, and if done so, it won't sprout well. I just don't know. Shrug!

If you are serious about growing your own garlic, buy the higher quality, larger bulb-size varieties. In Orlando you can grow hardneck, softneck, and Creole - all three categories of garlic. You would probably plant in late October to mid-November, by your county Extension Service folks can tell you when to plant. I'm in NE Mississippi and I plant all my garlic in mid-October. I have already harvested all my hardneck and will be bagging it over the next several days. The softneck and Creole will be dug up this coming week, after I have cleared all the hardneck out of my greenhouse. Garlic should be cured for a couple of weeks so that it develops its full flavor and stores longer. Thumbs up

You might want to take a look at the forum "Classifieds and Group Buys". Whistling
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Orlando, FLORIDA (Zone 9b)
Region: Florida
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OrlandoBill
May 24, 2014 1:03 PM CST
Blinking You said "garlic"...is ginger in the same family?
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
May 24, 2014 1:04 PM CST
Shoot, I'm sorry. I was referring to garlic, not to ginger. Sticking tongue out
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Orlando, FLORIDA (Zone 9b)
Region: Florida
Image
OrlandoBill
May 24, 2014 11:31 PM CST
I have my Senior moments! Crying

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