Plant ID forum: New wild flower to me

Views: 358, Replies: 7 » Jump to the end
Name: Rick
South central Kentucky
getterdone
Jun 10, 2014 9:01 AM CST
I have lived in this house for almost 11 years now. Behind me is a big field that the land owners crops every year. These
Thumb of 2014-06-10/getterdone/1df060 flowers came up this year for only the second time since I have lived here. They no teil plant each year so the ground never gets turned over. This winter here in my part of Kentucky stayed pretty wet, So I figured out why this is only the second time they came up. We wanted to dig some of them up for our flower bed. They were about 10 inches deep in the ground
Thumb of 2014-06-10/getterdone/11e098

. They come from bulbs. If the winter is to dry then they can't come up, but this spring they were hoping. So pretty, a real dark blue. The whole area looked like water. I hope they come back next year. Can any one tell me what they are called. Thanks.
rick better known as Getterdone
Name: Tara
NE, Florida (Zone 9a)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Organic Gardener Garden Sages Birds Frogs and Toads Plant Identifier
Dragonflies Butterflies Hummingbirder Orchids Container Gardener Garden Procrastinator
Image
terrafirma
Jun 10, 2014 9:05 AM CST
Mmmm, pretty! Could they be Grape Hyacinth?
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Master Gardener: Texas Permaculture Raises cows I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Beekeeper Garden Sages Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Image
dave
Jun 10, 2014 9:07 AM CST

Garden.org Admin

Probably Grape Hyacinth (Muscari botryoides)

It is shown as a native to your area of Kentucky.
Name: Rick
South central Kentucky
getterdone
Jun 10, 2014 9:12 AM CST
The ones We dug up and added to our flower bed kept there blooms for several days, then the flowers went to seed, The seeds have three sides to them. They are just now drying out enough to fall off the flower stem. Thanks for the help.
rick better known as Getterdone
Name: Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Plant Identifier
growitall
Jun 10, 2014 10:47 AM CST
dave said:Probably Grape Hyacinth (Muscari botryoides)

It is shown as a native to your area of Kentucky.


Yes to the species but no species of Muscari is native to North America. They are naturalized invasives where they occur in the wild.

Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Jun 10, 2014 11:05 AM CST
Could be Muscari neglectum.
Here is the description from Flora of North America

Racemes 12–20-flowered; leaf blades 3–8 mm wide; perianth tubes of fertile flowers globose, sky blue. 2 Muscari botryoides

Racemes 20–40-flowered; leaf blades 2–4(–5) mm; perianth tubes of fertile flowers obovoid to oblong-urceolate or cylindric, blackish blue. 3 Muscari neglectum

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=1...
wildflowersoftexas.com
texasnatureonline.com


Name: Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Plant Identifier
growitall
Jun 10, 2014 12:24 PM CST
It's not Muscari neglectum which, very characteristically, has a dark inflorescence, and assuming the photo colour is accurate, it doesn't appear to be M. botryoides either..

The ones in question look like plain old Muscari ameniacum.


USDA Plants has records of Muscari botryoides, M. comosum and M. neglectum being naturalized in the wild... yikes.
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Jun 10, 2014 12:35 PM CST
M. ameniacum is naturarlized in the US also. Just not as widespread as the others.
Here are the distribution maps.
http://bonap.net/NAPA/TaxonMaps/Genus/County/Muscari
wildflowersoftexas.com
texasnatureonline.com


« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Plant ID forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Dianthus 'Nyewood Cream'"