Plant ID forum: What kind of Hardy Hibiscus is this?

Views: 607, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Aug 12, 2014 10:59 PM CST
Grew it from seed someone gave me, they claim its a hybrid. Flowers vary from pure white to white with faint pink lines.
Thumb of 2014-08-13/keithp2012/d9ddee


Thumb of 2014-08-13/keithp2012/57c7a0

Name: Carole
Clarksville, TN (Zone 6b)
Cherish today
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar
Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Cat Lover Avid Green Pages Reviewer Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
Image
SongofJoy
Aug 13, 2014 6:53 AM CST
It does look like 'Disco Belle'.
The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched -- they must be felt with the heart. ~ Helen Keller
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Aug 13, 2014 11:38 AM CST
Either:
or

~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Aug 13, 2014 12:06 PM CST
plantladylin said:Either:
or



They look similar to luna swirl, but my center is hot pink not red, none of those have that trait.
[Last edited by keithp2012 - Aug 13, 2014 12:07 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #679661 (4)
Name: Carole
Clarksville, TN (Zone 6b)
Cherish today
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar
Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Cat Lover Avid Green Pages Reviewer Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
Image
SongofJoy
Aug 13, 2014 12:43 PM CST
It doesn't look like my "Luna Pink Swirl'.
The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched -- they must be felt with the heart. ~ Helen Keller
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Aug 13, 2014 2:48 PM CST
Here are a couple more for comparison, with my bad eyesight I can't tell if they have red or dark pink centers:
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Aug 13, 2014 10:09 PM CST
[quote="plantladylin"]Here are a couple more for comparison, with my bad eyesight I can't tell if they have red or dark pink centers:


Its got shape and center color of 'Pinot Grigio' but faint striping like 'luna blush'.

Mabye it is indeed a hybrid?
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
Charter ATP Member Organic Gardener Garden Photography Bee Lover Dragonflies Cat Lover
Butterflies Birds Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Spiders!
Image
JRsbugs
Aug 14, 2014 4:09 AM CST
The question is, was the seed bought as a hybrid, in which case you could claim a name if you knew what that name was.

If the seed came from a plant already growing, and that plant was a hybrid, then you can't give it a name as hybrids don't grow true from seed unless they have been directly hybridised by the grower.
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Aug 14, 2014 9:14 AM CST
JRsbugs said:The question is, was the seed bought as a hybrid, in which case you could claim a name if you knew what that name was.

If the seed came from a plant already growing, and that plant was a hybrid, then you can't give it a name as hybrids don't grow true from seed unless they have been directly hybridised by the grower.


The seed was given to me by someone who claimed they hybridized 2 hibiscus and the seed given was the result. They said its a Hibiscus moscheutos x Hibiscus coccineus but by the looks that seems impossible.
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
Charter ATP Member Organic Gardener Garden Photography Bee Lover Dragonflies Cat Lover
Butterflies Birds Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Spiders!
Image
JRsbugs
Aug 14, 2014 1:57 PM CST
Now that is interesting!

Do you know if the species claimed to be species were actually true species?

Do you know if the pollination process was isolated from other Hibiscus?

You need to know the answers to those two questions. If the answer is they were true species, and if the pollination process was isolated, then you would have a new hybrid from crossing those two species.

There are apparently different forms within the section including H. coccineus, a white form looks possible to have produced the flower you have with H. moscheutos.

Hibiscus section Muenchhusia: Hibiscus coccineus is another North American member of section Muenchhusia, which is composed of hardy, herbaceous, perennial Hibiscus species. Within section Muenchhusia, there are numerous naturally occuring forms as well as flower colors, ranging from pure white to deep red.


http://hibiscus-malvaceae.blogspot.co.uk/

It's a very nice Hibiscus!
[Last edited by JRsbugs - Aug 14, 2014 1:59 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #680353 (10)
Name: Keith
West Babylon, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: United States of America Winter Sowing Plays in the sandbox Birds Native Plants and Wildflowers Tomato Heads
Vegetable Grower Garden Photography Hybridizer Spiders! Annuals Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
keithp2012
Aug 14, 2014 8:38 PM CST
JRsbugs said:Now that is interesting!

Do you know if the species claimed to be species were actually true species?

Do you know if the pollination process was isolated from other Hibiscus?

You need to know the answers to those two questions. If the answer is they were true species, and if the pollination process was isolated, then you would have a new hybrid from crossing those two species.

There are apparently different forms within the section including H. coccineus, a white form looks possible to have produced the flower you have with H. moscheutos.



http://hibiscus-malvaceae.blogspot.co.uk/

It's a very nice Hibiscus!


I don't know if breeders were pure I do know the person has created their own new hybrids so I think pollination was isolated. If you say its possible that might be the answer.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Plant ID forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "Pacific Blue Ice"