Mid Atlantic Gardening forum: Hoses underground

Views: 295, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Name: Annie
Waynesboro, PA (Zone 6a)
Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry
Image
LysmachiaMoon
Aug 17, 2014 5:49 AM CST
I have a neat little idea I thought I'd share. After having one too many hoses chewed up by the lawnmower, I decided to put my hoses underground. I can't afford a big fancy installed watering system, and this "cheapo" version works pretty well.

First, I dug a small trench thru the lawn from the outdoor faucet to the vegetable garden. The trench is maybe 6-8 inches deep and only about 4-6 inches wide. IT DOES NOT NEED TO BELOW THE FROST LINE. In my garden, the distance from faucet to garden was about 60 feet. This was an easy dig, a lot easier than I expected (I did it in early spring when soil was soft. And I did not have to go through any hard surfaces (sidewalks, etc.)

Then, I bought some 1 1/2 PVC pipe at Lowe's in 10-foot lengths, plus the connectors to link it all up. Plus two 45-degree "elbows" that go on either end: one where the hose goes in, one where the hose comes up.

Just lay the pipe into the trench, thread through the hose, cover over the trench and there you are: hose underground.

Here's 3 hints. 1. It's much easier to thread the hose through the pipe BEFORE the pipe is all connected and underground. In other words, sort of string the pipe onto your hose like it's a giant string of "beads." Or, string a piece of clothesline or tough rope through the pipe as you're laying it so you have something to pull the hose through the pipe with.
2. I glued my pvc pipe and connectors together (with PVC cement), but I don't think that's absolutely necessary, especially if you intend to leave the hose in place permanently. (If you're going to be pulling it out and putting it back you'll want solid, smooth joints or the hose can hang up.) 3. ALWAYS leave something threaded through the pipe, either the hose itself or a piece of rope. Trying to wee-jee a hose through a pipe (esp. if it's a long one) is a frustrating slow job.

You can pull the hose out and store it for winter if you want, but I've left mine in place for YEARS and had no problems. (We routinely have below freezing winters) The trick is to make sure it's empty of water at the end of the season. Usually just disconnecting it from the faucet and taking off any sprinklers at the "output" end and letting it sit for a few weeks is enough to evaporate out any water. Or, if you have a compressor, you can "blow the line" with a shot of air.

I've got two long lines of these "underground hose conduits" in my yard (8 years and counting) and I'm planning to install two more this fall. It's a real time saver, no more pulling in and laying out hoses.
The end is nothing, the journey is all.
Name: Catmint/Robin
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Butterflies Forum moderator Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover Echinacea
Region: Maryland Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 The WITWIT Badge
Image
Catmint20906
Aug 17, 2014 6:17 AM CST

Moderator

wow, cool idea, Annie!
"One of the pleasures of being a gardener comes from the enjoyment you get looking at other people's yards”
― Thalassa Cruso
Name: Debra
Garland, TX (NE Dallas suburb) (Zone 8a)
Service dogs: Angels with paws.
Dragonflies Dog Lover I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Photography Bee Lover Plays in the sandbox
Butterflies Region: Texas I sent a postcard to Randy! Charter ATP Member Annuals Garden Sages
Image
lovemyhouse
Aug 17, 2014 6:38 AM CST
I agree I agree I agree
If you don't ask, the answer is always 'no.'
Name: Teri
Mount Bethel, PA
Charter ATP Member Region: Pennsylvania Hibiscus Container Gardener Clematis Region: Northeast US
Annuals Echinacea Winter Sowing Seed Starter Lilies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Image
Roses_R_Red
Aug 28, 2014 6:04 AM CST
Sounds like a great idea, but it wouldn't work for me. I have 2 spigots with 4 splits on each one. Not only do I need to turn the splits on and off according to where I want to water, but I need to move the hose 30 feet twice to get all the plants watered. I use to reel in the hoses, but now I just get off the mower and move the hose to a spot that has already been done.
Name: Catmint/Robin
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Butterflies Forum moderator Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover Echinacea
Region: Maryland Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 The WITWIT Badge
Image
Catmint20906
Aug 28, 2014 6:07 AM CST

Moderator

Moving the hose is one of my least favorite jobs! Right now I have a super long hose that I use in the backyard. I rarely use it in the front yard because it's a pain to move it there. I know, I know--just buy another hose! Hilarious!
"One of the pleasures of being a gardener comes from the enjoyment you get looking at other people's yards”
― Thalassa Cruso
Name: Annie
Waynesboro, PA (Zone 6a)
Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry
Image
LysmachiaMoon
Aug 28, 2014 9:44 AM CST
This idea works best in those cases where you have a hose that just sort of "lays there" all summer, one you don't need to disconnect and move around. In my case, it's the long one that runs from the house to the veg garden. At the veg garden fence, I attach a shorter hose with a nozzle, or sprinklers, or a divider and other hoses, etc. Think of the underground hose as a sort of "water pipe" that you will be attaching other hoses to. I have a second one that runs from the outside faucet to the lower part of my property. I usually keep a 4-way splitter on the faucet during the summer so I can run 4 "water lines" at once.
The end is nothing, the journey is all.
[Last edited by LysmachiaMoon - Aug 28, 2014 9:58 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #689002 (6)
Name: Teri
Mount Bethel, PA
Charter ATP Member Region: Pennsylvania Hibiscus Container Gardener Clematis Region: Northeast US
Annuals Echinacea Winter Sowing Seed Starter Lilies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Image
Roses_R_Red
Aug 28, 2014 10:08 AM CST
I neglected to envision splitters at the end of the buried hose!!! Picture is getting more vivid.
Name: Annie
Waynesboro, PA (Zone 6a)
Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry
Image
LysmachiaMoon
Aug 29, 2014 4:31 PM CST
It's my fault for not being more clear. I should have said that the underground hose acts as a sort of "water pipe" or "conduit" so you can attach another hose or sprinklers or whatever you like at either end. The one running to my garden only comes out of the ground about 3-4 feet. I always attach another hose to it, and just go from there. It's one of those things where, once you do it, you'll wonder why you did not do it before. nodding Smiling
The end is nothing, the journey is all.
Name: Catmint/Robin
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Butterflies Forum moderator Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover Echinacea
Region: Maryland Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 The WITWIT Badge
Image
Catmint20906
Aug 29, 2014 4:34 PM CST

Moderator

Annie, no fault at all--that is a great explanation!
"One of the pleasures of being a gardener comes from the enjoyment you get looking at other people's yards”
― Thalassa Cruso
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Hostas Ferns
Image
RickM
Jul 16, 2016 10:28 AM CST
I put a 4-way splitter at the house end of the run. Then:
1. 10' "local"
2. 75' Waaaaaaay in the back
3. 75' for the back and one side
4. 50' to a 2-way splitter on the side of the house. One port is for a soaker hose and the other is a 50' for that side and the front.

For #2, I have to cross a brick patio. So, I have a short hose with a quick-connect on the 'business' end that reaches to the other side of the patio. It connects to a quick-connect on the 75' hose that is buried. I used the non-shut-off quick connect so that the hose drains automatically when I disconnect. This has been in place for about 5 years now.

#4 is snaked around the patio and brick work to the bed on the side.

Someday, (when I'm working again), I'll actually bury the above ground under the brick work. But, not this year!
What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it. Charles Dudley Warner
Name: Susan
Vienna, VA (Zone 7a)
Birds
Image
Muddy1
Jul 16, 2016 8:33 PM CST
Good ideas, Rick! I really have to do something to help irrigate my back yard, because I have lots of water-needy shrubs growing on steep slopes. Every summer I say that, then comes the fall when I actually could install driplines without stepping on perennials, and do I do anything to make my life easier the following season?? Nooooo....

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Mid Atlantic Gardening forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by nativeplantlover and is called "Bumble Veronica Pink"