Learn the Latin: Botanical or scientofic names!

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Learn the Latin

By Xeramtheum
October 26, 2014

Learning Latin names is not as difficult as you might think. A little at a time, we can learn the Latin names of our plants and avoid quite a bit of confusion.

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Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
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NEILMUIR1
Nov 11, 2014 12:15 PM CST
Although Linnaeus wrote Systema naturea in mostly Latin, he also used words from countries he visited, So his work is not true Latin, it is a mixture of many countries.
For instance in this handy little book PLANT NAMES SIMPLIFIED THEIR PRONUNCIATION DERIVATION AND MEANING, all Linnaeus named plants have (L.) after them, which is excepted in botany.
Of course the nomenclature of plants or flora has changed over centuries. Linnaeus died on the 10th January 1778 and although he did come to England and stayed in Beckenham Place Park, it is known he was unwell and old, so it is not recorded if he wrote in his updates anymore, whilst there.
The little book named above was itself first published in 1931 and reprinted a lot. It was written by Johnson & Smith and is easily available.
Of course many plant hunters were named in plants they discovered in Victorian times, that was along time after Linnaeus died.
One classic I remember is the name for willow. That of course is Salix and is attributed in some books to Linnaeus. However Salix comes from old English and means sal. (near) and Ix. (water).
As we all know some willows do like to be near water, and that name is definitely not Latin. Neither are thousands of other names.
Your Article was great and if people use Botanical or scientific names, it makes life so much easier.
Great Article.
Many kind regards from a most cold and wet England.
Neil.



[Last edited by NEILMUIR1 - Nov 11, 2014 12:16 PM (+)]
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Name: Anne
Summerville, SC (Zone 8a)
Be a voice - not an echo!
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Xeramtheum
Nov 11, 2014 1:12 PM CST
Thanks for the history lesson Neil! I did know that not all names were Latin but didn't know Linnaeus borrowed words from other languages!

I lived in Rickmansworth for a few year so I know exactly what you mean by 'a most cold and wet England'! The hardest part about living there was the Fall and Winter when it would get dark so early.
"We were all humans until race disconnected us, religion separated us, politics divided us and wealth classified us."

Unknown

Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Seed Starter Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters The WITWIT Badge
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NEILMUIR1
Nov 12, 2014 5:33 PM CST
Dear Anne. if I may call you that? It is dark when you go to work and dark when you come home here. The rain is occasional Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing , but we can grow most things here.
However my beloved tree ferns love it, in their most secluded spot.
So here are some pictures, I have taken. Albeit not all tree ferns.
My kindest regards from a most sodden England.
Neil.
Thumb of 2014-11-12/NEILMUIR1/be18d4 Thumb of 2014-11-12/NEILMUIR1/614cc3
Thumb of 2014-11-12/NEILMUIR1/2371c6 Thumb of 2014-11-12/NEILMUIR1/2ed178

Name: Anne
Summerville, SC (Zone 8a)
Be a voice - not an echo!
Plant and/or Seed Trader Enjoys or suffers cold winters Hybridizer Birds Seed Starter Pollen collector
Butterflies Greenhouse Bookworm Bulbs Hibiscus Plant Identifier
Image
Xeramtheum
Nov 12, 2014 10:51 PM CST
Wow Neil! Your Tree Ferns are just lovely and I love the color of that Passiflora!

I miss my garden in Ricky - especially the Deodar.

Thumb of 2014-11-13/Xeramtheum/654fd0 Thumb of 2014-11-13/Xeramtheum/207f18

I don't miss the Winters. I didn't really realize just how far north England was until I moved there.

A
"We were all humans until race disconnected us, religion separated us, politics divided us and wealth classified us."

Unknown

Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Seed Starter Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters The WITWIT Badge
Image
NEILMUIR1
Nov 13, 2014 11:15 AM CST
Well Rickmansworth is not really north! The name Rickmansworth comes from the Saxon name Ryckmer, the local landowner, and worth meaning a farm or stockade. In the Domesday Book of 1086 it was recorded as the Manor of Prichemaresworde. Other spellings include Rykemarwurthe (1119–46), Richemaresworthe (1180), Rykemerewrthe (1248), Richemereworthe (1259), Rikesmareswrth (1287), Rikmansworth (1382), Rikmeresworth (1396) & Rykemerysworth (1418). Anything above the Watford gap and you need a passport! Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Some pictures for you.
Regards from an overcast England.
Thumb of 2014-11-13/NEILMUIR1/374b03

Who says you can't use Parthenocissus quinquefolia as ground cover! I tip my hat to you.
Neil.
[Last edited by NEILMUIR1 - Nov 13, 2014 11:16 AM (+)]
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