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Name: Valery Leonard
Palm beach county, florida (Zone 10a)
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Valery
Nov 22, 2014 5:09 AM CST
I'm in PBG and the moles are ruining the lawn. I'm forever stomping down the runs. Does anyone know how to get rid of the?
Valery
Name: Jean
Fleming Island, FL (Zone 9a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers Composter
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qwilter
Nov 22, 2014 7:09 AM CST
Moles are there because you have some sort of grubs/bugs in the ground for them to eat. Kill the grubs & the moles will go find another feeding ground.

Do you have cats? Putting used kitty litter in their runs will also drive them away.
Blessed are the Quilters for they are the Piecemakers.
Name: Valery Leonard
Palm beach county, florida (Zone 10a)
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Valery
Nov 22, 2014 7:21 AM CST
No, no cats. A dog and thankfully she doesn't try to dig them up. I see very few grubs when digging for planting. But good advice, we'll give it a try.
Also being a new Floridian, and about lawns, the weeds are making me crazy. As is Florida grass itself. In NJ this grass was considered a weed. I so miss my beautiful fine bladed lawn. The weeds not only are numerous, they grow on runners. I pull in one spot and see it coming up a foot away. One grows are ground level and up over the grass. It smothers it from all sides. And it spreads so far and then flowers and seeds. And when my dog comes in she's got these darned sticky seed pods all over her legs. What the heck is this stuff and how do I get rid of it. My husband practly killed the whole yard once trying to spray. And for a gated community we have a good size yard. The largest in the community. Hit it lucky. But I'm trying to make garden beds along the back fence. I can't get rid of the weeds. Although I have not yet tried newspaper and mesh. Any help.
Valery
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Nov 22, 2014 8:46 AM CST
Use (at the appropriate time of year) one of the 'lawn weed and feed' products and that will help a lot with controlling the weeds.

And Welcome! to Florida!! We have a year round growing climate which is why it is so much harder to control weeds here.

You CAN grow the fine bladed grasses here (Paspalum is one of them) but it's a LOT of maintenance. Ask any golf course.....
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Nov 22, 2014 9:56 AM CST
Valery, I had good luck driving the moles away by just sticking the hose down their holes and flooding the tunnels. But Jean's absolutely right, they are there because you have some insects in the lawn that they are feeding on. If you don't want to spend money and nuke your ecosystem using a broadcast lawn insecticide, flooding the tunnels is the best non-toxic way to drive them away. Next you need to change your mind about lawn.

The environmental thing to do about lawn here is to simply "mow what grows". The grasses that grow here are not very nice for lawns, unless you are looking at them from far away. You'd no sooner walk on St. Augustine grass in your bare feet than . . walk on gravel, jmho.

The huge amount of labor, chemicals, machinery and water it takes to grow a 'beautiful lawn' are just the reason to reduce the amount of lawn you have to the bare minimum. Everything you do to grow beautiful fine-bladed grass here is bad for the environment, not to mention really expensive and labor intensive.

The concept of a gracious garden having expanses of lush green lawn came from England where, as you say, nice grass grows easily. That simply doesn't apply here in Florida. It's chemical warfare to try and grow a lush lawn, and will be an exhausting, ongoing battle. You'd be much better advised in the long run to spend all that chemical money on shrubs, trees, perennial native flowers and mulch. Reduce your lawn area a square yard or two at a time until you just have pathways of grass to walk on, for the dog to run on, etc. and your life will be much simpler and less work. Not to mention it will be 10 minutes of mowing twice a week in summer, not an hour or two.

Sorry, putting away my soap box now . . Angel Big Grin
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Nov 22, 2014 10:02 AM CST
I TOTALLY agree, Elaine!! Nibble away at that lawn foot by foot until you just have a token strip left (which is likely required by your HOA)..... Personally, after 15 years here, I am grass free! Thumbs up and so are some of my neighbors.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Nov 22, 2014 12:03 PM CST
Me too! We are on a corner, and have 'verges' belonging to the county that I don't want to cultivate. So that area outside our fence is 'mow what grows' and my neighbor mows it weekly for us in summer with his rider mower in exchange for well water for his garden. A true 'win-win'.

No water, fertilizer, weed killer, fungicide or insecticide - it gets nothing but mowing, and honestly, driving by in your car you'd never know it's not a nice grass lawn. It looks fine, and costs us virtually no money, time or work.

Here's a picture of our 'lawn' under a huge oak tree on the east side outside our fence. It's nearly impossible to grow grass under oak trees anyway, so we think this looks pretty darn nice for a no-maintenance area. This was taken in March, so it's more lush in the summer months, too.
Thumb of 2014-11-22/dyzzypyxxy/659f37

Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Elfrieda
Indian Harbour Beach, Florida (Zone 10a)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Hibiscus Sempervivums Sedums Dragonflies
Herbs Roses Foliage Fan Annuals Cut Flowers Ferns
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orchidgal
Nov 27, 2014 10:16 PM CST
I am totally grass free also and couldn't be happier. I have my paths, arbors and pergolas and a paved courtyard. I do have big flower beds and lots of containers -- all guaranteed to keep me as busy as I want and not having to worry about weed killer, fungicide or insecticide. Sometimes I do use a good home remedy, recommended by the University of Florida.
Home made soap and oil spray for insect control (this can also help keep mealy bug under control).
Mix: 2-1/2 Tbsp cooking oil + 2- ½ Tbsp baby shampoo. Mix well in 1 gallon of water.

Note: Shake well before and during application. Water the plant well the day before you spray. Do not spray during the heat of the day in full sun. Reduce potential injury by rinsing the plant with fresh water a few hours after the soap spray application. Thorough coverage of the pest is necessary so spray both sides of the foliage thoroughly until it drips form the leaves.
Spray every 5-7 days as needed.
If a fungus is also present then add to the above formula: 2 Tbsp baking soda
Note: Shake well before and during application. If the weather is humid or the threat of disease is high, spray every five to seven days. Spray both sides of the leaves thoroughly. Always test any spray on a small area of the plant.

The use of soap or oil for insect control will control the insects but will do nothing to correct the condition that is making the plant susceptible to the insects. Using foliar applications of fish emulsion and seaweed may help weak plants do better. (I use Max Crop - no smell.)


“I was just sittin’ here enjoyin’ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listen”
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