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Vermicomposting: Easy and Efficient Composting with Worms

By dave
August 22, 2011

Whether you live on a self-sufficient homestead or in an apartment in the city, you should consider keeping a bin of worms to turn your kitchen scraps into the best compost available. Here's how to get started.

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Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Dec 9, 2014 6:42 PM CST
Has anyone found this helps harbor or bring in fungus gnats?

I only ask because 4 or 5 years ago I decided to start keeping all my coffee grounds to use them on my garden and flower beds. To save them, I used a 13 gallon plastic trash container placed under my sink, and each day threw in the coffee grounds. After a few weeks I noticed gnats. Then I started some seeds in potting mix, and they wiped out some of my seedlings by their larvae eating off the roots. Then I tried to figure out what the nasty thing was, and after finding out, it seemed to have started with the coffee grounds.

Secondly, I really want to do this, but can the containers even be smaller? I have very little space in house at all. Two or three plastic shoe box containers would fit my space better than a 10-gallon container as in the article. Thanks.
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Master Gardener: Texas Permaculture Raises cows I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Beekeeper Garden Sages Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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dave
Dec 9, 2014 8:00 PM CST

Garden.org Admin

We've never had fungus gnats in our worm bins, that I can think of. We are always very careful to make sure everything added gets buried under the cardboard bedding, and I am certain that's an important step.

As for smaller: yes! You sure can. We have even had great success using 5 gallon buckets (using just the bottom 1/3 of the bucket) as bins so you can see you can use almost any size container.
Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
Image
HoosierHarvester
Dec 9, 2014 8:01 PM CST
Thank You!

Hope to get started soon. Have lots of cardboard boxes, and little shop in town sells the red wigglers as fishing bait.

raeellis
Dec 12, 2014 12:29 PM CST
Thumb of 2014-12-12/raeellis/7f566f I have 9 bins in plastic drawers about 1 cubic foot each and containing approx 1000 worms. I love the smaller size as it's easy to deal with quickly!

Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
Image
HoosierHarvester
Dec 12, 2014 12:35 PM CST
Welcome! raeellis . Wow ... that's nice. I notice the label says 3-bin. I'm guessing those bins pull out with that lip made handle? And it looks like you are using shredded paper as versus cardboard?
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Master Gardener: Texas Permaculture Raises cows I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Beekeeper Garden Sages Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Image
dave
Dec 12, 2014 12:43 PM CST

Garden.org Admin

Great idea for a bin! I love it. Thumbs up

raeellis
Dec 13, 2014 1:47 PM CST
I mix the cardboard and shredded newspaper together :)

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