Page 1 of 2 • 1 2
Views: 894, Replies: 33 » Jump to the end
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 14, 2014 12:42 AM CST
do indoor plants that need hunidity as a rule need humidity at home when the weather is cold 10 celcius because we dont heat the house when we are out at work.
another question.i am an educator and have thousands of extra matches////can i stick them into my plant pots?
thank you david
[Last edited by davidsevit - Dec 14, 2014 4:23 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #749184 (1)
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 14, 2014 4:24 AM CST
davidsevit said:do indoor plants that need hunidity as a rule need humidity at home when the weather is cold 10 celcius because we dont heat the house when we are out at work.
another question.i am an educator and have thousands of extra matches////can i stick them into my plant pots?
thank you david


Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Dec 14, 2014 8:00 AM CST
Hi David, Welcome to All Things Plants.

You didn't say exactly what plants you are growing indoors and while some houseplants would do okay in the 10ºC/50ºF indoor temperatures, others would prefer it somewhat warmer than that; also, if the temp's fluctuate a lot the plants may not be happy trying to adjust from one extreme to another and it's not good to have them near drafty windows or doors either. You can raise the humidity around your plants by grouping them together and placing them on pebble filled trays with a small amount of water in the trays; adding more water as the level gets lower and evaporates.

Confused I'm not sure what you mean by being an educator and having thousands of extra matches to stick into the plant pots but maybe someone else will understand that and be able to offer advice.

Again, Welcome! to ATP!

Lin
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
Dec 14, 2014 9:05 AM CST
Welcome! David. I agree with everything Lin says. I too don't understand what matches have to do with plants. Sorry. Sticking tongue out
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Region: Canadian Bulbs Winter Sowing Enjoys or suffers cold winters Lilies
Peonies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
CarolineScott
Dec 14, 2014 9:12 AM CST
I guess that matches confiscated from students ?
contain some phosphorus compounds in the tip,-- so might be a source of phosphorus?
My learners were older so did not do that!

Welcome to ATP!
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
Dec 14, 2014 10:04 AM CST
Confused You may be right, Caroline.
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
Region: California Plant Database Moderator Roses Irises Clematis Garden Photography
Cottage Gardener Keeper of Poultry Hummingbirder Bee Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
Calif_Sue
Dec 14, 2014 10:09 AM CST

Plants Admin

I'm confused too, what's the connection between being an educator and having matches? Confused or what their possible purpose would be in a plant pot. Shrug!
My gardening Blog!
Hand sewn wares and vintage finds in my Etsy store. Summer Song Cottage
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Dec 14, 2014 10:38 AM CST
I bet David did mean that he's had to confiscate the matches from students; I don't know why that never crossed my mind. My husband is a professor at a local University and their campus is now tobacco free. Many of the students and some faculty members don't like the idea because they can't even smoke in their vehicles in the parking lots ... but campus sure is a lot cleaner now without the litter of cigarette butts.

I've never heard of anyone using match sticks as a phosphorus source for their plants and I'd have no idea how many should be used per plant but it may be a good method of recycling those matches. Green Grin!
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 14, 2014 1:14 PM CST
thanks to all the answers.
i will start again about humidity.
for example the anthurium in summer needs humidity and i have it on pebbles with water not touching the roots...all that i know.but i will say it again....if in the winter we go out to work and their is no heating and the air is not dry(like in many homes-heating causes dryness) so then does humidity have any role in cold conditions?
yhe match sticks is quite a story....as an educator i take the matches out of the boxes cause the students build with the empty boxes.so i am stuck with thousands of matches.
last year i dumpted them innocently into my compost heap thinking i was doing good to nature.giving back the wood.but i think i killed or burnt the worms theis because of the phosphorous and whatelse....
as caroline said i want to fertilise my plants with my left over matches.
looking at the ingrediants of matcheads is a litlle bit confusing...
thanks for anybodies help.
david
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 14, 2014 10:32 PM CST
davidsevit said:thanks to all the answers.
i will start again about humidity.
for example the anthurium in summer needs humidity and i have it on pebbles with water not touching the roots...all that i know.but i will say it again....if in the winter we go out to work and their is no heating and the air is not dry(like in many homes-heating causes dryness) so then does humidity have any role in cold conditions?
yhe match sticks is quite a story....as an educator i take the matches out of the boxes cause the students build with the empty boxes.so i am stuck with thousands of matches.
last year i dumpted them innocently into my compost heap thinking i was doing good to nature.giving back the wood.but i think i killed or burnt the worms theis because of the phosphorous and whatelse....
as caroline said i want to fertilise my plants with my left over matches.
looking at the ingrediants of matcheads is a litlle bit confusing...
thanks for anybodies help.
david


Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Dec 15, 2014 4:20 PM CST
As long as the temperature stays above 40F/4.44C , most houseplants will be okay. I have found lack of humidity a problem with mine in winter; I use wood heat, which is dry, and I find humidifying essential. However, I never had much problem with humidity when I've used other forms of heating.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Rabbit Keeper Critters Allowed Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages
Herbs Region: Georgia Region: United States of America Native Plants and Wildflowers Dog Lover Composter
Image
greene
Dec 15, 2014 5:06 PM CST
This does not answer your question David, but now that I know about the match sticks, please do a Google Image search using the key words "what can I build with wood match sticks" and you may find some new projects for your students; if not suitable for your students you could offer the matchsticks to another teacher who could utilize them. Thank you.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Dec 15, 2014 5:35 PM CST
I don't know where David lives or what grade level he teaches but because of the fire hazard I don't think schools here in the U.S. would ever allow matches in the classroom.
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 15, 2014 10:36 PM CST
gemini_sage said:As long as the temperature stays above 40F/4.44C , most houseplants will be okay. I have found lack of humidity a problem with mine in winter; I use wood heat, which is dry, and I find humidifying essential. However, I never had much problem with humidity when I've used other forms of heating.


i live in jerusalem were temperature goes down under 0 alittle.
i am talking about humidity in cold weather
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 15, 2014 10:46 PM CST
this not question just something to share ....i am giong to build home made moss pole for my singonium plant.
it is made out of a long peace of styrofoam stuck to it saw dust.as i understand the sawdust has an ability to preserve water
so the plant can feel at home
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 16, 2014 1:53 AM CST
i am not sure that i am functioning well in this sight.i feel that only by chance i send questions and get answers the same way.it seems like their is alot of potential in this sight
david
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
Image
valleylynn
Dec 16, 2014 9:57 AM CST
Don't give up David. We are here.

Can you post photos of the moss pole you are making? So we have a better idea of what it is you are doing?
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Dec 16, 2014 11:06 AM CST
i just put the glue this evening it looks a little bit bulky and not natural.maybe i will give it another coating and then take a picture of it.actualy it needs to go with the plant.syngonium
david
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Rabbit Keeper Critters Allowed Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages
Herbs Region: Georgia Region: United States of America Native Plants and Wildflowers Dog Lover Composter
Image
greene
Dec 16, 2014 11:17 AM CST
plantladylin said:I don't know where David lives or what grade level he teaches but because of the fire hazard I don't think schools here in the U.S. would ever allow matches in the classroom.


My suggestion for craft projects using wooden matches starts with the assumption that the matches would first have the tips either burnt or cut off and therefore would be safe for classroom use.

Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Dirt
(Zone 5b)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Photography Bee Lover Region: Utah Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Photo Contest Winner: 2015
Image
dirtdorphins
Dec 16, 2014 11:41 AM CST
Hi David! Welcome!

Concerning humidity loving plants--I am just guessing we are primarily talking about tropical plants then?
My thoughts are that the plants would prefer to be warmer and humid during the day when they receive light and have their cool period at night --still with humidity-- because that is what they would get in their natural environment.
As far as I know, they like humidity all the time regardless of the temperature--but I think that they need it more when it is warmer. Probably they could tolerate lower humidity when it is cooler, but humidity loving plants don't really like to be cold and dry either.

How are your plants doing? with cool days and warm nights and whatever humidity you do provide?
If they seem to be suffering a little I would suspect that the problem is not so much a lack of humidity when it is cool in the day but more the fact that it is cool in the day...
If they are doing fine, then humidity probably does not play a significant role when they are cool in the day...

Matches--I have heard of people using a book of paper matches at the bottom of the planting hole and covered with soil for peppers--some rave about their success with this method and others claim it makes no difference.
The chemistry:
http://www.cengage.com/chemistry/book_content/0547125321_zum...
The tip of a strike-anywhere match is made from a mixture of powdered glass, binder, and tetraphosphorus trisulfide (P4S3). When the match is struck, friction ignites the combustion reaction of P4S3. The heat from this reaction causes an oxidizing agent such as potassium chlorate to decompose, which in turn causes solid sulfur to melt and react with oxygen, producing sulfur dioxide and more heat. This then ignites a paraffin wax that helps to “light” the wooden stem of the match. The chemistry of a safety match is quite similar, but the location of the reactants is different. The phosphorus needed to initiate all the reactions is found on the striking surface of the box. Thus, in theory, a safety match is able to ignite only when used with the box. For a safety match, the striking surface contains red phosphorus, which is easily converted to white phosphorus by the friction of the match head on the striking surface. White phosphorus ignites spontaneously in air and generates enough heat to initiate all the other reactions to ignite the match stem.

Personally, I use matches to ignite fire but not as fertilizer because there are so many better, balanced, cheaper, and legitimately beneficial fertilizer options available that are not very useful for starting fires Hilarious!
(I find it funny that we here speculate first that the matches were confiscated from students Hilarious! and you are right Lin--fire hazards and safety rules would certainly prohibit playing with matches in schools here!)
Anyway, what to do with all those matches? Since they are the thing with value as matches, perhaps you could return them to the match manufacturer in exchange for empty boxes which are the thing of value to you and your students. In the future, perhaps you could even figure out how to acquire the boxes themselves without the matches from the manufacturer of the boxes? I'll bet you could get a lot more empty boxes for the same investment without the disposal problem on the back end.

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by sunnyvalley and is called "Hair-raising"