Daylilies forum: Alphabet of Daylily Terms...Let's Talk About "S"

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Name: Char
Vermont (Zone 4b)
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Char
Feb 23, 2015 7:16 AM CST

Moderator

So many "S" terms to choose from.....I'll start with..

Spider
The Spider form is a single flower form of daylilies with a petal length that measures four or more times the width. Here is a link to the AHS Dictionary which shows how to measure a spider...
http://www.daylilies.org/ahs_dictionary/spider_measurements....

A few spider daylilies I grow..




Stippled
The flower color of stippled daylilies have a pattern made from different colored, sized and shaped dots.

Pitter Patter with white spots on a lavender pink base.


Mark's Bouquet, has a stippled pattern further out on the segments,


while the color of Kaleidoscope Fantasy is completely stippled.


Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
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Hemlady
Feb 23, 2015 8:02 AM CST
There certainly are a lot of S's. Here are a few.

SPATULATE

I really don't know how to explain the flower on a spatulate other than they are usually wider petaled and a very open bloom.

OPEN HEARTH

Thumb of 2015-02-23/Hemlady/fd0564

LUSCIOUS LOLLIPOP

Thumb of 2015-02-23/Hemlady/87de7e

Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
Hybridizer Irises Butterflies Charter ATP Member Birds Cat Lover
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Hemlady
Feb 23, 2015 8:03 AM CST
SEMI-EVERGREEN

SCAPE

SPECIES

SEPALS

SEEDLINGS
Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Feb 23, 2015 8:50 AM CST
A very simple "S" word for today Sun. Daylilies love the Sun. I do have some in part shade and they bloom. Some daylilies do better in more shade than others, but most (maybe all) prefer more sun.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Feb 23, 2015 8:54 AM CST
Well I have to go with two of my favourite subjects, spring sickness and stratification.

Stratification, damp chilling of seeds. Two pics below showing what it does. The first is a batch of daylily seeds refrigerated for six weeks in a dry condition, so not stratified, then planted at room temp. Pic taken after four weeks at room temp:

Thumb of 2015-02-23/sooby/03a2d2

Now for the properly stratified seeds, from the same batch as above but instead refrigerated in damp vermiculite for six weeks before planting. Same number of seeds as above and pictured also four weeks after planting at room temp - only one had not germinated by then (I think it was missing the embryo so a no-go to start with):

Thumb of 2015-02-23/sooby/86cd6d

These particular seeds typically have roughly 25% non-dormant seeds and 75% dormant ones and therefore if not stratified before planting germination will be erratic over several weeks or even months.

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Polymerous
Feb 23, 2015 9:14 AM CST
Those stippled daylilies are striking, Char.

My terms for today are seed, stratification, seedling, small flowered, and spring volunteer – all of which I will explain below.

Seeds are produced in pods during the bloom season. Once harvested, they may or may not then be stratified prior to planting out.

A dictionary definition of Stratify is to:

place (seeds) close together in layers in moist sand or peat to preserve them or to help them germinate.

When I first started producing daylily seeds several years ago, what I learned (correctly or otherwise) was that the seeds needed to be stored moist and cold in order to promote germination, at least for seeds from dormant daylilies. I do this, not with sand or peat, but by storing the seeds in small ziploc bags in the fridge. Each cross has its own bag, to which I add a small piece of paper towel, and enough water to keep everything moist. (The past two years I have also added a bit of hydrogen peroxide to the water.)

Interestingly enough, I recently read a blog post by Brian Reeder, who credits Mike Huben, to the effect that seeds do not need to be stratified in order to obtain good germination. http://daylilybreeder.blogspot.com/2013/09/2013-season-endin...

Once the seeds have germinated and have successfully started growing, they are now termed seedlings.

The definition of seedling per the AHS:

In the daylily, used to reference any unregistered plant raised from seed. A seedling may be of any size or age and may or may not be used in a hybridizing program.

Right now I have several daylily seedlings of varying ages, as well as seeds stratifying in the fridge (potentially the last time that I do this step, depending on if I get rapid and good germination without it).

Some of my intermediate sized seedlings (I have smaller ones, jammed 9 to a 4" pot, awaiting planting out, as well as some larger and older multi-fan clumps):

Thumb of 2015-02-23/Polymerous/03e166

Some of my daylily seedlings are small flowered daylilies, which the AHS defines as:

Daylilies classified as small have blooms that measure 3 inches or more but less than 4.5 inches in diameter.

While I very much like and prefer large flowered daylilies, I think that the small flowered daylilies are peculiarly suited to both large and small gardens; their size lends them a particular charm, and as with yellow daylilies, every garden should have at least one.

Some small flowered daylilies currently in my garden:






(The last one is unfortunately rust susceptible, but I am keeping it and am going to plant it out near the new seedling bed that we are building.)

A small flowered seedling of mine:

Thumb of 2015-02-23/Polymerous/90d099

It should be noted that not all seedlings have a known genetic heritage. In my garden, I tend to stumble upon spring volunteers. Clearly, these seedlings are from seeds dropped or escaped during harvest the previous bloom season (or potentially from seasons before then), which overwinter and germinate on their own. Sometimes the pod parent is obvious from the location of the seedling; the pollen parent is never (with absolute certainty) known.

Last season I saw one spring volunteer seedling from ‘Sacrament of Healing’ bloom; this season I await bloom on two more, as well as bloom on various other volunteer seedlings from other locations (and thus, other pod parents) in the garden.

Thumb of 2015-02-23/Polymerous/dca46a


The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Feb 23, 2015 9:37 AM CST
Polymerous said:

Interestingly enough, I recently read a blog post by Brian Reeder, who credits Mike Huben, to the effect that seeds do not need to be stratified in order to obtain good germination. http://daylilybreeder.blogspot.com/2013/09/2013-season-endin...


They don't always need stratification but it's not a myth that they benefit from it if any in the batch have seed dormancy. I'm not sure what Mike H. might have meant there because he has experimented with scarification (not stratification) to germinate daylily seeds. Sometimes seed dormancy can wear off in time, such as with dry storage. Whether a daylily seed is dormant or not may also depend on the environmental conditions experienced by the parent, as well as the seed itself.

That daylily seeds can benefit from stratification was first determined by Dr. Robert Griesbach back in the 1950's. You can read his study reports on the AHS web site:
http://www.daylilies.org/AHSarchives/Griesbach.html

The experiment I pictured above was one of several that show stratification is beneficial to daylily seeds, but only those that have seed dormancy. So one can't generalize either way, unfortunately.

What I always say is if your daylily seeds typically germinate erratically over weeks or months, but they do eventually germinate (they're viable), then in future they should benefit from stratification if you wish to make them germinate more quickly and not erratically. If your daylily seeds germinate immediately with your current method then there's no point in adding stratification to your method. I should add that seed dormancy doesn't necessarily correlate to foliage habit.



[Last edited by sooby - Feb 23, 2015 9:40 AM (+)]
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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Feb 23, 2015 9:41 AM CST
Polymerous,
Really enjoyed the link. I still would love to get some opinions on the need to stratify seeds that are not planted almost immediately. I have read somewhere, that almost all seeds do not need to be stratified if they are planted immediately after collecting. But, if they are stored for a period of time, then they will need to be stratified to break dormancy. Just want people to be aware that there may still be a need for stratification if the seeds have been stored.
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
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Polymerous
Feb 23, 2015 10:05 AM CST
Thanks, Sue and Larry. Off to read the Griesbach articles.
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Ashton & Terry
Jones, OK (Zone 7a)
Windswept Farm & Gardens
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kidfishing
Feb 23, 2015 10:17 AM CST
Spider
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Seeds
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Seedlings
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Kidfishing
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Feb 23, 2015 11:46 AM CST
Self as in solid color with no patterns or eye

Name: Hilary Picton
Dousland, Devon UK (Zone 9a)
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Halfprice
Feb 23, 2015 12:54 PM CST
Showy!
Rocket Booster
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John Karl Seager


All American Chief
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Yellow Angel
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Applique
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Mary's Gold
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Loco Bo


Carnival in Mexico
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Foolish Dragon - new last year


Name: Hilary Picton
Dousland, Devon UK (Zone 9a)
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Halfprice
Feb 23, 2015 1:35 PM CST
And here's another, "settling-in". Sometimes it takes a while for a new plant to settle in while others settle quickly.

Media Frenzy - settled in and increased very quickly. I love it!


Realised there was no pic in the database so have added a couple.
It is just fabulous in a clump, definitely stands out!


[Last edited by Halfprice - Feb 23, 2015 1:40 PM (+)]
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Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
Hybridizer Irises Butterflies Charter ATP Member Birds Cat Lover
Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Vegetable Grower Daylilies Hummingbirder Heucheras
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Hemlady
Feb 23, 2015 3:39 PM CST
STERILE - Unfortunately some daylilies are sterile in both pod and pollen.

SCAPE BLASTING - the scape actually does blast. I don't think there is a known cause but I have had some blast from too much rain.
Lighthouse Gardens
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Feb 23, 2015 8:39 PM CST
SALTER

springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Feb 23, 2015 8:41 PM CST

Siloam


http://www.daylilies.org/DaylilyDB/
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Feb 23, 2015 8:42 PM CST
SUBSTANCE


SUNFAST
(Zone 7a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Avid Green Pages Reviewer
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dormantsrule
Feb 23, 2015 11:50 PM CST
Slug damage.


Thumb of 2015-02-24/dormantsrule/dfb4b0

Photo used in avatar purchased on istockphoto.com
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
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Polymerous
Feb 24, 2015 1:54 AM CST
Slugs. Ugh. And also snails.

I am very familiar with that kind of damage. Glare

I highly recommend Sluggo. http://www.amazon.com/Monterey-Sluggo-Control-Organic-Garden...
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Feb 25, 2015 6:48 PM CST
STOUT
http://www.daylilies.org/DaylilyDB/

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