Daylilies forum: Starting Daylilies from seed

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Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Mar 29, 2015 9:57 AM CST
I hope it is okay to post this question here. I have collected seeds from my Daylilies and I want to know if there is anything special I have to do to grow Daylilies from these seeds. Can someone help me? Some are from the yellow Stella d'Oro and some are NOID.
Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,
Name: Pat
Near McIntosh, Florida (Zone 9a)
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Xenacrockett
Mar 29, 2015 10:21 AM CST
There are lots of ways to start seeds and everyone has their favorite method.

This year I think I'll be sticking seeds collected from my own plants directly in ground.
(Getting tired of any extra work transplanting seedlings)

Otherwise, my favorite way of starting seeds is to use Perlite moistened with distilled water
and peroxide in a baggy. I think I'm using about 20 oz. distilled water and a teaspoon of peroxide.
There are lots of formulas online.

Moisten the Perlite and drain off any excess. Add the seeds and set in a warm spot out of direct sun.
If you need to stratify, put the baggy in the fridge for 3 weeks prior to putting in a warm spot.
Then check occasionally for any green showing.

When there is green, I then plant in ground and cover with Perlite to discourage fungus gnats.

Like said, everyone has there own method. I've tried methods of some and had 0 luck.
You'll need to experiment.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Mar 29, 2015 11:22 AM CST
I would be inclined to stratify for an extra week and make it four weeks. It may not make a huge difference but also allows somewhat for differences in refrigerator temperature (the higher the stratification temperature the longer stratification takes) and caters for some seeds needing a little longer. The stratification temperature range was established as 0-10C (32-50F)*, so the nearer you are to the lower end but without freezing them, the more quickly stratification should have an effect. Remember that chilling the seeds dry does not have the same effect as chilling them damp, hence the moistening of the perlite or whatever else you use (e.g. vermiculite, sand, peat moss, kitchen paper towels).

What will happen if you don't stratify, and if some or most of the seeds have seed dormancy, is that they may still germinate but erratically. Some may take weeks or months to sprout. With stratification they should all germinate more or less together within a week or two of starting at room temperature. If your seeds don't have any seed dormancy for whatever reason then stratification is unnecessary but unless you try them without it you won't know that.

*Griesbach, R. A., & Voth, P. D. (1957). On dormancy and seed germination in Hemerocallis. Botanical Gazette, 223-237.
Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Mar 29, 2015 12:20 PM CST
Thank you Pat and Sue,
I will put them in a baggie of damp vermiculite and will put them in the bottom of the refrigerator for 3-4 weeks. By then I should be able to just plant them outside in my raised beds. Or do you think they should go directly into the ground rather than raised beds. My raised beds are 4' x 8' and 3 landscape timbers high. Your input is greatly appreciated.
Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,
Name: Ed Burton
NE Wisconsin
Hybridizing, Lily Auction seed sell
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EdBurton
Mar 29, 2015 12:51 PM CST
I use trays 50 cell 2x2 peat pots, any good seed starter mix, "I use cheapest I can find", get it moist, "not wet"
I bury seed about an half inch deep, cover tray with a plastic dome. 7 to 10 days later they start breaking the surface, dormant can take longer.
Some of my seed buyers use plastic cups with a hole in the bottom and a baggie as a cover, whatever works ;~)

The reason I start indoors is because I sell seeds, I need a complete history of the cross, the germination percentage, to get an earlier start to the season, and to keep squirrels or feral cats from digging around in the seedling beds before seeds sprout

I know a lot of folks add water and peroxide solution to seeds and sprout in bowls or baggies, to many extra steps for me for the same results.
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Ed Burton

seed seller "gramps"
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Mar 29, 2015 1:14 PM CST
gardenglassgems said:
I will put them in a baggie of damp vermiculite and will put them in the bottom of the refrigerator for 3-4 weeks. By then I should be able to just plant them outside in my raised beds. Or do you think they should go directly into the ground rather than raised beds..


Without knowing what your weather is going to do it's hard to say. Personally I would still stratify in the fridge first because then they'll all germinate together when you sow them outside, and they'll also be a little ahead in growth. If they don't adequately stratify outdoors then some could take a lot longer to germinate and if you have erratic germination you may find weeding more difficult. It's largely a matter of personal preference. You could split them and try both ways and see which suits you best for the future. I would avoid sowing them outdoors until you're as certain as you can be that there won't be a really hard freeze.

Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Mar 29, 2015 2:40 PM CST
Thanks Sue and Ed, I just got done putting some seeds in damp vermiculite in baggies and put in fridge bottom bins. I also put some of the same seeds in damp paper towels in baggies in the same fridge. They should be ready to put straight in the ground the end of April/first of May. I am not planning on starting them in pots inside. This is my first time trying the stratification method. Do you think that Allium seeds and Lupine seeds also need to stratify? What about Columbine and Delphinium seeds? These are all seeds I collected from my own plants in the fall. I appreciate all your advice.
Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Mar 29, 2015 2:51 PM CST
I'm one that prefers to start them in the fridge, and I don't take them out until they germinate. I use makeup remover pads, cut in half, and soaked with water and peroxide. I've had 100% success rate this way, but lots of people have 100% success doing it a different way! After germination, I put them in pots outside, but this year, I may put some in the ground too.
Natalie
Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Mar 29, 2015 3:06 PM CST
Natalie, how long do you leave them in the fridge roughly before they germinate? I have more seeds so I think I will get some makeup remover pads and try that with water and peroxide. How many seeds do you put on each half? Do you fold the pad in half or just stack them one on top of the other? Sorry about all the questions. I never had much luck with growing from seed because I think I was doing it all wrong. I was thinking about getting a small greenhouse but first I need to learn how to germinate my seeds correctly. Thank you everyone for your valuable information. Thumbs up
Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Mar 29, 2015 3:49 PM CST
It just depends on the seeds, Jeanne. They have their own schedule. I always leave them until the sprout. Some from the same pod take longer than others. Most germinate fairly quickly, within two weeks. I've had others take two months.

I just dampen the pad, squeeze out the excess water/peroxide, put it in a small ziplock bag, and put the seeds on it, without folding it. That is why I cut them in half. It's a waste to use a whole one. I also put the tag off of the pod in the bag, which lists the cross. Normally I'll take all of the baggies and stick them in a gallon bag. I always put all of the seeds from a pod on one pad. Sometimes it gets a little crowded, but I've had no problems with doing it that way.

I have a greenhouse, but have had much better luck starting them in the fridge first. And, I never plant them until they germinate, because it's nice to know that they have started growing before sticking them in a pot. I don't think I'll ever do it any other way, because I've had such great success this way. It works for me, but you may find a way that you like better. For me, this is just very quick and easy. Just make sure that you remember to check the seeds once in a while. They can start growing fast!
Natalie
Name: Kyla
Richmond, VA (Zone 6b)
Composter Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Herbs Daylilies Sempervivums
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kylaluaz
Mar 29, 2015 4:25 PM CST
I took advantage of Hemlady's seed giveaway last fall, and received twelve different kinds of crosses. I wintersowed three seeds of each in half-gallon translucent jugs, in December. Every jug has at least one germinated seed and most have two or three healthy looking babies. I'm delighted how easy this was. Well, so far. Heh.

I intend to pot them all up so I can keep track of who's who, at least for a while!
Name: Teresa
South central KY (Zone 6b)
Consider the lilies of the field
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bluegrassmom
Mar 29, 2015 5:10 PM CST
Hello, if anyone is interested in daylily seeds, I have just posted a list of crosses in our Classifieds. I hope you see something you like!

The thread "Daylily Seed Crosses for Sale" in Classifieds and Group Buys forum
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Mar 30, 2015 6:05 AM CST
Natalie said:I have a greenhouse, but have had much better luck starting them in the fridge first. And, I never plant them until they germinate, because it's nice to know that they have started growing before sticking them in a pot. !


Natalie, just wondering why you don't keep them damp in the fridge for 4 weeks to stratify and then take them out and let them germinate at room temperature? You still don't have to stick them in a pot until they've germinated, but they should germinate quicker at room temperature after being damp chilled compared to if they remain in the fridge.

Jeanne, for your other seeds you might want to ask on the "Seeds" forum. It's a while since I've started any of these, but onions don't typically need stratification. Lupins need scarification if they have a hard seed coat (that's abrasion of the seed coat) not stratification. According to my old propagation textbook, columbine may respond to damp chilling and delphinium seeds are short-lived and can be started outdoors. But I'd suggest asking on the other forum unless someone who frequents both can comment here.

Name: Jeanne
Lansing, Iowa (Zone 5a)
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gardenglassgems
Mar 30, 2015 8:11 AM CST
Thanks Sue. I will post this question on the Seeds Forum. Thanks for the suggestion. I have quite a bit of both seeds so I may just experiment and see what happens. Since I collect these and bring them in the house in the fall, they do not have the chance to sit on the ground over the winter. That is the reason I was wondering if the seeds I collect need to be cold before they would germinate. Thank You! everyone for your great input.
Yard decor, repurposing, and flowers,
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Mar 30, 2015 10:32 AM CST
Sue, it is just easier for me to leave them in the fridge until they germinate. I've already got more than enough seeds sitting around that aren't in the fridge. Hilarious! I've had some germinate in less than four weeks too. I just like to keep them there, and it works really well for me, so that is what I do.

Jeanne, I was going to mention the columbine seeds, and forgot. I've been a complete failure at growing them from seed, when putting them in a pot. I'm obsessed with daylilies, but columbine is my favorite flower. The only way I've ever been successful at getting it to grow from seed is to let Mother Nature do it for me. When the seed pods open, I fling the seeds out of the pod, and onto the dirt. I have lots of little seedlings coming up this year using that method. I can transplant them if I want, but for now, I think I'll just leave them where they are, which is right outside my office window. I don't know if they are tough to grow, or if it is just a case of me not being very lucky at growing things from seed, but this method works really well for me. They sit outside all winter doing it this way, so maybe they do need to be chilled.
Natalie
Name: Judi
East Texas (Zone 8a)
alameda
Mar 30, 2015 12:49 PM CST
I am just now getting the hang of growing seeds [and thanks to lots of advice on the forums]. Last fall I discovered the same thing Natalie uses - round cotton pads. I leave my seeds in the fridge until I want to start them. I then mix a bowl of distilled water/hydrogen peroxide [1 T to 1 Cup]. I put a bit of this solution in each of the plastic baggies the seeds are in, put them in a colored plastic cup and put them in a dark pantry. I start checking after 4 days [usually sooner as I am curious]. When I see the little white nub [called a radicle] coming out of the seed, I get another plastic baggie, label it I use stick on labels that I write on with a Sharpie pen - Walmart, baggies come from craft section there], moisten a cotton pad and squeeze out excess and put seeds in. If there are only a few, I fold it over. If there are lots [I had all 7 out of one batch germinate at once] I get 2 pads and make a "sandwich". I put all these bags in a clear plastic cup and place in a bright window. I start checking in about 4 days to see if there is any green. I put my latest batch on the windowsill March 23 - as of yesterday, most started to show green. I will let the little root get a bit longer and see the beginnings of a tiny green leaf, then I will plant them. I use sterilized leftover containers from the annuals I buy and use a seed starting mix. I poke a hole, put the root facing downward, a pair of tweezers helps position the seed in the hole. I cover with fine sand [can get a bag in the aquarium section at Walmart] and sprinkle over the top to cover. Sand seems to help with gnats. I will put this in whatever it fits in so I can keep a level of water in the bottom - aluminum roasting pans work well, and I have ordered some of the seedling trays that fit perfectly. I have a shelf in my garage that gets bright light all day and this seems perfect for them. When they start growing leaves, I put a few alfalfa pellets around the seedlings - this has really greened them up and they are growing well. I spray leaves with fish emulsion and am going to try kelp. After getting some advice from the forum, am now going to start very lightly fertilizing with some liquid fertilizer. I found that the roots grow really fast and they will need to be repotted [or planted outside] in a few weeks. I think the coddling in the pots really helps, plus I enjoy fiddling with them. I have found also that my bare root roses do better with being first grown out in pots. My daylily seedlings that I started last fall are outside and growing well and I am watching them closely to see if any need repotting in larger pots - I already have quite a few that moved up in the bigger pots. I don't have a bed ready for them to be planted outside just yet, so they will stay in pots for awhile. I also am organized about the labeling as I want to know what the crosses are - from seeds I have ordered from the Lily Auction and ones I hybridized myself. To me, its no fun to see seeds bloom if you don't know the parentage. So I keep detailed records on my computer, but try to make it simple. For 2014 crosses - I label thusly: 14-01, 14-02, etc. I can put this number easily on a label in the pot - then refer back to it on the computer like this: 14-01 - Alice du Pont x Barbara Burkheart - then add any dates of potting, other information I want.

Everyone gets their own system and I have learned so much from asking questions and reading about what other people do. This works for me - I am still learning about fertilizing so still ask lots of questions. I will eventually get my seedlings up to 1 gallon pots and will probably put them in a kiddie pool with bottom water/fertilizer to grow out for the rest of the year. Tommy Maddox, a talented hybridizer, has been water pools for all his seedlings. Here is a photo of my sprouted seeds on a cotton pad. Good luck and have fun!
Judith
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Name: Becky
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Butterflies Seed Starter Container Gardener
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beckygardener
Mar 30, 2015 4:10 PM CST
I just grow mine in styrofoam cups in my south window during Fall and/or Winter. I don't even cover mine with anything but potting mix. I, too, have my own method that has worked very well for me for several years. I wrote an article on ATP about my particular method: http://garden.org/ideas/view/beckygardener/1839/Growing-Dayl...

Everyone has their own method of sowing and growing from seeds. I do prefer to grow mine in cups and label them since I am trying to keep track of the crosses just in case I get a few that I want to name and register. You never know when you might get something worth registering, so it's good to know the parents of a seedling!
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters, compared to what lies within us.
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Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
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Hemlady
Mar 31, 2015 6:14 AM CST
I wait till May here and just put my daylily seeds in pots outdoors and let nature do the rest. The diploids germinate very quickly. The tetraploids usually take longer. I may try stratifying the tets this year to get them started faster.
Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Mar 31, 2015 8:57 AM CST
Natalie said:Sue, it is just easier for me to leave them in the fridge until they germinate.


Natalie, do you have any idea of the temperature in your fridge where the seeds are?



Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Mar 31, 2015 9:51 AM CST
I don't, even though I have a temp gauge in the fridge. I have never put it in the drawer!
Natalie

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