Ask a Question forum: liquid fertilizer

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Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
May 2, 2015 10:44 PM CST
if i take a chunk of garbage from my undone composter and dilute it with water.....will the liquid be an efficient fertilizer ?or efficient killer?
i once covered a lawn with diluted chicken pooh and i burnt the whole lawn.
is there any test you can make to see the acidity or some other poison of the liquid?
i mean simple test not going to laborataries and so on?maybe lakmus paper?
and how about the chunk itself?if i mix it with soil and plant a plant.......do i have to do comparisons all the time(between two plant pots)or just get a clever answer from one of you out there in the globe?
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
May 3, 2015 8:57 AM CST
IF your compost is completely done, i.e. nice dark brown crumbly stuff, you can make a 'tea' out of it and use it as a mild fertilizer, David. But there's no telling what you'd get using compost that's not done.

Especially since you had that old pile with all the stinky stuff going on, I'd hold off on trying to use any of it for compost tea at least until it's done. This gardening thing, it takes a lot of patience.

In addition, there's no guarantee what your plants are getting when you use compost tea. That's why fertilizer bags say on the labels "Guaranteed analysis" which means for sure your plants are getting the Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium plus the trace minerals. For now, you should break down and buy a little bit of organic fertilizer that suits your needs (what plants you are growing) to be sure you're not going to burn, starve or poison them while you experiment and learn.

The compost itself is really a soil amendment, used for adding those important cellulose fibers to the soil to add nutrient and moisture retention. The cellulose fibers in your compost act like tiny sponges that retain water, and as they dry, shrink a bit to allow air into the soil. The valuable soluble nutrients in compost are used up by the plants or washed away by rain and irrigation quite quickly. So, while we'd love to think we can just feed our plants with compost, unless you have vast amounts (and none of us ever have enough Sighing! Rolling my eyes. ) it's not going to supply enough nutrients for most plants.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
May 3, 2015 10:32 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:IF your compost is completely done, i.e. nice dark brown crumbly stuff, you can make a 'tea' out of it and use it as a mild fertilizer, David. But there's no telling what you'd get using compost that's not done.

Especially since you had that old pile with all the stinky stuff going on, I'd hold off on trying to use any of it for compost tea at least until it's done. This gardening thing, it takes a lot of patience.

In addition, there's no guarantee what your plants are getting when you use compost tea. That's why fertilizer bags say on the labels "Guaranteed analysis" which means for sure your plants are getting the Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium plus the trace minerals. For now, you should break down and buy a little bit of organic fertilizer that suits your needs (what plants you are growing) to be sure you're not going to burn, starve or poison them while you experiment and learn.

The compost itself is really a soil amendment, used for adding those important cellulose fibers to the soil to add nutrient and moisture retention. The cellulose fibers in your compost act like tiny sponges that retain water, and as they dry, shrink a bit to allow air into the soil. The valuable soluble nutrients in compost are used up by the plants or washed away by rain and irrigation quite quickly. So, while we'd love to think we can just feed our plants with compost, unless you have vast amounts (and none of us ever have enough Sighing! Rolling my eyes. ) it's not going to supply enough nutrients for most plants.


wow such a good answer
thanks alot
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
May 3, 2015 1:41 PM CST
My pleasure, David. I am mostly indoors in the middle of the day right now as it's getting pretty hot here.

So, here I am doing my gardening online instead of getting my hands dirty . . . Sighing! Shrug!
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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