Adeniums forum: Help with Adenium plants

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Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 3, 2015 8:21 AM CST
I purchased 9 adeniums from the local box store, they drenched these and finally decided to put these on sale. What I want to do is save them. Can someone give me advice on what to do? I have only recently started growing adeniums ( last three years).

After I got home, I put these in the full sun to help dry them out. Now I am wondering what is the next step, should I repot?

Thanks for all your help.

Anole
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Name: KadieD
Oceania, Mariana Islands (Zone 11b)
Wet Tropical AHS Zone 12
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Rainbow
May 3, 2015 12:03 PM CST
Very nice specimens. Smiling I would definitely unpot to check for rot. Someone will come along here shortly to give you details as to what to do for rot.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
May 3, 2015 3:52 PM CST
So far they all look good to me. It maybe still be in semi-dormancy, so put in part sun/shade and wait for newer leaves to form and to allow it to dry since you said it got drenched; if your overnight temps are 55F and higher, you can leave it outdoors. If it rains a lot in your area, you may want to repot and make the soil more well draining. I usually add more perlite and pumice in the media. My personal preference is using shallow but a bit wider clay containers.

Oh, I should have asked first..are you planning to keep them in containers or do you intend to plant them in-ground later?
Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 3, 2015 5:31 PM CST
My plan is to put them in pots, I don't think they would make it through the winter here. Our temps got up to 80 degrees today-they are drying out.

thanks for the help.

Anole
Name: Rick
Vancouver Island, Canada (Zone 8a)
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RCanada
May 3, 2015 6:41 PM CST
I would definitely repot with a free draining gritty mix. This way you will be able to examine the roots and Caudex for any abnormalities (rot, etc.) and know what they are potted up into.
The leaves would most likely fall off anyway.
It would be a good start.
Rick
"Many times a day I realize how much my own outer and inner life is built upon the labors of my fellow men, both living and dead, and how earnestly I must exert myself in order to give in return as much as I received"
Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 3, 2015 7:18 PM CST
Thanks for the advice Rick, I will repot and check out the roots and caudex on each.

Anole
Name: Doris Klene
Greensburg,Indiana.
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kareoke
May 4, 2015 5:47 AM CST
I also would repot, and watch out for having them in direct sun right away, they need to be watched so the leaves do not burn.
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11+
Charter ATP Member
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coconut
May 4, 2015 12:16 PM CST
Out of those pots immediately. Nursery grown plants are potted ,,, generally, in Promix, and they are very carefully watered so they're near perfect all the time, never drenched. These plants look severely stressed to me. I bet many of the little roots, are rotted now. Those pots will not dry quickly enough.

Out of the pots and washed clean, then dry for a few days.

Let us know what you find! And maybe a photo or two of the plants out of that soaking wet suffocating Promix. Good stuff, Promix, for petunias and coleus...
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
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Dutchlady1
May 4, 2015 12:23 PM CST
I agree with Melissa, they need to dry out a bit before potting them up again.
Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 4, 2015 3:41 PM CST
thanks all for the help, I will keep you posted on their progress.

Anole
Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 4, 2015 4:22 PM CST
After I read the previous emails, I went out and inspected the adeniums and after two days they were not drying out. I removed the plants from the pots and found that the potting mixture remains very damp. I brushed away most of the potting soil with a soft paint brush and washed away as much of the potting soil as possible. Here are pictures of where I am now. I will allow these to dry out ( 2-3 days??) and then will repot in a very drainable mixture.

Please offer your comments so I can save these. Thanks !!!!

Anole
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Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
May 4, 2015 5:13 PM CST
I would have suggested exactly what you are doing. Thumbs up
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11+
Charter ATP Member
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coconut
May 5, 2015 10:24 AM CST
They actually look pretty good, not what I'd expected.

Go ahead and give them their new homes!

Apologies for the extra work, but better safe than sorry!

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Name: Deborah Pryor
Orangeburg, SC Zone 8a (Zone 8a)
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Deebie
May 8, 2015 8:28 PM CST
I did buy a couple of those Costa Farms DRs from HD a few weeks ago. The medium is sandy soil, so it drains OK. What I did for now is take them out of those deep pots and removed at least 2/3 of the soil and replanted them in a more shallow pot. Later on, I'll look into changing the medium to make it more chunky. I found mine on clearance for $6.98. They were out of bloom, so I don't know what color(s) they are. Will post pictures when I get a chance.
Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 10, 2015 6:46 PM CST
I repotted all of them a couple of days ago, some of the leaves are turning yellow, probably expected. I could not pass these up as they had cut the price by 90%. I bought all nine for the price of one. I look at this as a rescue, I couldn't let them die. I have learned a lot from this, thanks to everyone for the help and encouragement. I will post pictures in a few weeks.

Anole
Name: Melissa E. Keyes
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
Zone 11+
Charter ATP Member
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coconut
May 11, 2015 9:19 AM CST
Good for you! I too rescue plants occasionally, and they thrive.
Oahu, Hawaii
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jericson22
May 17, 2015 11:34 PM CST
if i were you, ill cut all the bottom roots, like chop it off, and make sure the knife you gonna use is sterilized spray fungicide or brush it, i use neem oil for mine, i just dip them, after that i let them dry for 10days, hang them, after they dry out, soak them in a root hormone for 2hrs, let them re-hydrate, after that plant them in your choice of media, make sure your soil is not super wet, just moist, since its already soaked in a root hormone,

like this
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i use coco coir, organic compost, worm casting, perlite, biochar, mykos, azomite, volcanic rocks "cinders" on my soil blend, i use it on everything from flowering plants to vegetables, they are fluffy and when i water, water just go straight to the bottom,

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[Last edited by jericson22 - May 17, 2015 11:36 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #855974 (17)
Name: Rick
Vancouver Island, Canada (Zone 8a)
Seed Starter Peonies Plumerias Dog Lover Hibiscus Region: Canadian
Tropicals Keeps Horses Cactus and Succulents Adeniums
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RCanada
May 18, 2015 7:21 AM CST

Wonderful tutorial Jeriscon. So nicely done. I am unfamiliar with the Mykos, Azamite and biochar. What are these ingredients, if you don't mind me asking?
Rick
"Many times a day I realize how much my own outer and inner life is built upon the labors of my fellow men, both living and dead, and how earnestly I must exert myself in order to give in return as much as I received"
Name: John
Thibodaux, La. (Zone 9a)
Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
anole
May 18, 2015 4:16 PM CST
Jeriscon, thanks for posting the tutorial. I am not that brave or experienced to cut them yet. I did use a soil blend that does not hold water. As a matter of fact, I see now that most of the potting soils seem to hold too much water and cause problems. I am also not familiar with biochar, mykos, azamite. Are these a product found in Hawaii?

thanks for your information

Anole
Oahu, Hawaii
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jericson22
May 18, 2015 9:30 PM CST
azomites has 70+ trace minerals

Biochar is a name for charcoal when it is used for particular purposes, especially as a soil amendment. Like most charcoal, biochar is created by pyrolysis of biomass.
Biochar is under investigation as an approach to carbon sequestration to produce negative carbon dioxide emissions.
Biochar thus has the potential to help mitigate climate change, via carbon sequestration.Independently, biochar can increase soil fertility of acidic soils (low pH soils), increase agricultural productivity, and provide protection against some foliar and soil-borne diseases.Furthermore, biochar reduces pressure on forests.Biochar is a stable solid, rich in carbon, and can endure in soil for thousands of years.

mykos or mycorrhizae, Mycorrhizal fungi colonize the plant’s root system and develop a symbiotic association called “mycorrhiza”
They form a network of fine filaments that associate with plant roots and draw nutrients and water from the soil that the root system would not be able to access otherwise.
Mycorrhizae are formed with more than 90% of plant species

no they are not product of hawaii, you can find them all over the place, or order them online

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