Ask a Question forum: seeds of sweet pea and nasturtium

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Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
May 10, 2015 1:13 AM CST
i have just collected some seeds that fell off sweet peas and nasturtium and.........i feel like sowing them in a feww days after they dry a little bit?
i know the summer is on its way but also i feel i will forget where i kept them to sow for next years bloming in spring....
if i put them in a neglected spot that does not get water in the summer will they bloom from rain water this coming winter?
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
May 10, 2015 12:14 PM CST
David, I'm thinking your summers are very hot and dry? The nasturtiums should thrive through your summer weather if you keep them watered a bit. I grew them in Salt Lake City for years and they would re-seed in the fall and come up on cue in spring, then bloom all summer. We have at least a month of 100+ degrees F weather there in summer.

Sweet peas are a cool-weather lover and need lots of water. I honestly don't know if their seeds would survive being planted now and going through the summer heat. They may sprout and then die of heat or dehydration. If they didn't sprout, they'd likely be eaten by birds or other critters. You'd be better off to save them in a little glass jar or something else clean and air-tight. Put them on your computer desk where you will see them often? Plant them next year in February or so.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Jason
Gold Bar, Washington (Zone 8b)
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riverman123
May 10, 2015 2:27 PM CST
we always put our nasturtium seeds on a paper towel and place them in a window for the winter. most make through to next year, some don't. we collect many of them to even our odds a tad. but I don't know if freshly collected seeds work in the same manner...? the ones we have collected and stored in the past always get potted or planted in "bad" soil. they always do better for us if the soil is in shall we say, rough conditions. sandy, with lots of pebbles, debris, and very little nutritional value. seems to be just fine. no use using expensive potting soil and fertilizers! cant speak for everyone, but its worked very well for us!
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
May 10, 2015 11:20 PM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:David, I'm thinking your summers are very hot and dry? The nasturtiums should thrive through your summer weather if you keep them watered a bit. I grew them in Salt Lake City for years and they would re-seed in the fall and come up on cue in spring, then bloom all summer. We have at least a month of 100+ degrees F weather there in summer.

Sweet peas are a cool-weather lover and need lots of water. I honestly don't know if their seeds would survive being planted now and going through the summer heat. They may sprout and then die of heat or dehydration. If they didn't sprout, they'd likely be eaten by birds or other critters. You'd be better off to save them in a little glass jar or something else clean and air-tight. Put them on your computer desk where you will see them often? Plant them next year in February or so.


thanks for your tips I will behave according
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
May 10, 2015 11:21 PM CST
Jason that was good help thank you

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