Marvelous Martagons: Lilies for the Landscape: Great Article, a couple of questions....

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Marvelous Martagons: Lilies for the Landscape

By magnolialover
July 6, 2015

In recent years, the use of the martagon lily in the landscape has made a bit of a comeback. For years, martagons had been given a bad reputation of being difficult to grow and too expensive. As a result, they became more difficult to obtain. As we celebrate lily week, we will take a look at these beautiful, graceful lilies that are perfect for the woodland setting. We celebrate their comeback and availability in commerce and we will share tips for planting them and ensuring their success.

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Name: Lori Bright
San Luis Obispo, California (Zone 7a)
Vegetable Grower Roses Cottage Gardener Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Keeps Goats
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LlamaLlori
Jul 5, 2015 8:46 PM CST
When I run into "Tiger" Lilies whilst out backpacking, they are always
creek side. So, can you tell me.....
Do they naturalize? Will they naturalize in a dry
location under my oak trees? (Central California)
What kind of moisture do they require?
Must it be riparian?
Thanks so much!
Lori
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jul 5, 2015 8:51 PM CST
Tiger lily is a common name applied to a lot of lilies. Do they look kind of like my avatar?
Name: Linda
southern Minn. (Zone 4b)
Hostas Peonies Cat Lover Daylilies Garden Procrastinator Region: Minnesota
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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alwaysbehindMN
Jul 6, 2015 9:21 AM CST
I always think of "tiger lily" as an orange one with black spots and loaded with bulbils along the stems. When they bulbils fall to the ground and root, you will have huge numbers in no time! They are of the Asian species 'lancifolium'. I think there are several native American species still found in California, none of which I have ever seen. Are they the "turk's cap" form like the European martagons? My "authority" on all things lilies is Ed McRae, author and associate of Jan de Graaf at Oregon Bulb Farms.
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jul 6, 2015 1:19 PM CST
There are no L. lancifolium native to the US. The native lily most often referred to as "Tiger Lily" here is L. columbianum. This is a totally different lily from L. lancifolium. I am waiting to hear back from Lori about some additional descriptive information to help pinpoint the species.
Name: Linda
southern Minn. (Zone 4b)
Hostas Peonies Cat Lover Daylilies Garden Procrastinator Region: Minnesota
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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alwaysbehindMN
Jul 6, 2015 4:02 PM CST
Connie - I was unclear in my previous comments! I did not mean to infer that L. lancifolium was an American species, although it is a very common garden lily.
The only American species I have grown is L. michiganense, and as I said, I have never even seen any of the Pacific coast species.
Name: Mary Stella
Anchorage, AK (Zone 4b)
Peonies Ponds Dahlias Canning and food preservation Lilies Permaculture
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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Oberon46
Jul 7, 2015 9:07 AM CST
Are L. michiganense invasive. I found one that looked like that in my garden and was told it was very invasive. Of course, I am pulling feverfew from all over my garden after planting one little plant. Arghhhh.
"What a person needs in gardening is a cast iron back with a hinge in it" Charles Dudley Warner (spelling edited by Dinu lol)
Name: Lori Bright
San Luis Obispo, California (Zone 7a)
Vegetable Grower Roses Cottage Gardener Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Keeps Goats
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LlamaLlori
Jul 9, 2015 9:54 PM CST
Hi Connie, thanks for the response.
I googled L. columbianum and is sure looks like that one.
I'm good with many plants, alas lilies are not one of them,
so I'm just guessing. I see them in the Big Sur part of the
California Coast and (I think) I see the same ones in the
Sierra Nevadas. They are almost always in a riparian area.
Silly Me, I'm surely answering my own question about where
they can grow. (Don't tell, but I have collected a few seed....
Plant OCD, I'm working on it) I just have this vision of some
sort of tall, native lily growing happily under my Coastal Live
Oak trees near my home. What do you think, is there help for me?
Thanks again, Lori Rolling my eyes.
Name: Deb
Buffalo, Minnesota (Zone 4b)
Region: Minnesota Birds Cactus and Succulents Hostas Hummingbirder
dmurray407
Jul 11, 2015 8:47 AM CST
Any recommended sources for L. michiganense? I've read that they are very attractive to hummingbirds and pollinators. I planted my first Martagon this spring. So far so good; )
Deb

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