Ask a Question forum: the soil where the corn grew

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Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Aug 5, 2015 2:51 AM CST
can i use the soil where my sweet corn grew in a 15 litre container?
should i leave the roots and everything in the container because there are some nutritions that could be good for some winter plants.....maybe soon i can sow some sweet peas(also sweet)?or bulbs?
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
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Shadegardener
Aug 5, 2015 2:39 PM CST
Sweet corn takes a lot of nitrogen from the soil. Legumes might add enough back into the soil. You might need an innoculant for the peas.
Name: david sevitt
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davidsevit
Aug 6, 2015 1:41 AM CST
Shadegardener said:Sweet corn takes a lot of nitrogen from the soil. Legumes might add enough back into the soil. You might need an innoculant for the peas.


Sorry what is an innoculant. Legumes?
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Aug 6, 2015 2:15 AM CST
Legumes are a group of plants; peas, beans, soybeans, lentils, etc. Someone suggested you grow peas which are a Legume.

Corn is a 'heavy feeder' taking nitrogen from the soil. Legumes have the ability to 'fix' nitrogen in the soil but first one must add an inoculant to help the legumes to create more nitrogen. This link explains it pretty well.
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/beans/soil...

Dave wrote and article, part of which (about 1/3 of the way down the page) explains why we should consider planting the Legumes with corn, something you may consider. There is a photo of the nodules on the roots. http://garden.org/ideas/view/dave/240/Planning-Designing-and...

Hope this helps. Thumbs up
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Aug 6, 2015 2:56 PM CST
greene said:Legumes are a group of plants; peas, beans, soybeans, lentils, etc. Someone suggested you grow peas which are a Legume.

Corn is a 'heavy feeder' taking nitrogen from the soil. Legumes have the ability to 'fix' nitrogen in the soil but first one must add an inoculant to help the legumes to create more nitrogen. This link explains it pretty well.
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/beans/soil...

Dave wrote and article, part of which (about 1/3 of the way down the page) explains why we should consider planting the Legumes with corn, something you may consider. There is a photo of the nodules on the roots. http://garden.org/ideas/view/dave/240/Planning-Designing-and...

Hope this helps. Thumbs up


thank you for your reply
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Aug 6, 2015 3:27 PM CST
I tip my hat to you.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
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Weedwhacker
Aug 6, 2015 7:33 PM CST
In Dave's article he states "grow corn, beans and squash together. The corn feeds on the beans' nitrogen while providing climbing support to the beans. The squash provide a thick groundcover that preserves moisture while blocking weed growth."

David, I would just like to add: Climbing beans can indeed be grown with corn, and squash, BUT: this works best with a corn that is being grown for mature, dry ears -- such as popcorn, ornamental corn, or corn intended to be ground into cornmeal, and with a bean variety that is a "weak climber" that will not overwhelm the corn, and is being grown to obtain dry beans, such as soup beans (not snap beans). That way, when the squash is mature and ready to harvest, the corn and beans are also ready; trying to harvest sweet corn and/or snap beans from a patch filled with squash vines is a near impossibility -- I tried it in my (much, much) younger days and speak from experience! Smiling
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Name: david sevitt
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davidsevit
Aug 6, 2015 10:23 PM CST
Weedwhacker said:In Dave's article he states "grow corn, beans and squash together. The corn feeds on the beans' nitrogen while providing climbing support to the beans. The squash provide a thick groundcover that preserves moisture while blocking weed growth."

David, I would just like to add: Climbing beans can indeed be grown with corn, and squash, BUT: this works best with a corn that is being grown for mature, dry ears -- such as popcorn, ornamental corn, or corn intended to be ground into cornmeal, and with a bean variety that is a "weak climber" that will not overwhelm the corn, and is being grown to obtain dry beans, such as soup beans (not snap beans). That way, when the squash is mature and ready to harvest, the corn and beans are also ready; trying to harvest sweet corn and/or snap beans from a patch filled with squash vines is a near impossibility -- I tried it in my (much, much) younger days and speak from experience! Smiling


thank you for your reply i see that there are alot of angels to the subject.since i have 4 buckets i will dismantle one....check what happened underground.....see if there is any ground left....and then decide if it is suitable to plant anything...your description was good for thoughts about next year sowing....
thanks for the lesson

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