Views: 2043, Replies: 5 » Jump to the end
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Dec 22, 2010 8:52 PM CST
All these books are available at Amazon.com.
I've included Amazon.com ratings
Books that I have.
Wildflowers of Texas by Geyata Ajilvsgi 4 1/2 stars
Large, beautiful photographs. Flowers arranged by color.

Wildflowers of Houston & Southeast Texas by John and Gloria Tveten 4 1/2 stars
Photograph are a bit small compared to the previous book but still very good quality.

Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas by George Oxford Miller 5 stars
The first 53 pages deals with landscaping. The remainder is dedicated to individual native plants, with plenty of information on each species, including suitable zone, propagation, environmental requirment and more.

I don't have these but they are on my wishlist.

How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest: Revised and Updated Edition
by Jill Nokes 5 stars

Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest: A Practical Guide
by Delena Tull 4 stars

Remarkable Plants of Texas: Uncommon Accounts of Our Common Natives by Matt Warnock Turner 4 1/2 stars

Texas Wildscapes: Gardening for Wildlife, Texas A&M Nature Guides Edition
by Kelly Conrad Bender not rated

Legends and Lore of Texas Wildflowers by Elizabeth Silverthorne 4 1/2 stars
wildflowersoftexas.com
texasnatureonline.com


Name: Linda
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 26, 2010 5:34 PM CST
I'm a book-aholic, as far as Texas native plants or anything close to that are concerned. Really should stay out of bookstores and off book sites! I think I've got every single book you mentioned, except the second one...and it doesn't cover my area, otherwise I'd have it.
The newest book is Texas Wildscapes Gardening for Wildlife by Kelly Conrad Bender, which I've barely flipped through, but it looks really exciting!
Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country by Marshall Enquist
For a field guide for this area, it's excellent, it's my native plant bible. I can't exist for long without it near me. The only downside is that they haven't chosen up to update it in any way since it came out in 1987, so the botanical names are dated, Also, this paperback will fall apart fairly soon if used much...and how can you NOT use it a lot? But I just love it!
Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest by George O. Miller
Great book, wonderful info and pictures. Some of the plants are from elsewhere in the Southwest, but that's okay.
Native Texas Plants Landscaping Region by Region by Sally Wasowski and Andy Wasowski
A truly amazing book! The large amount of info in it is well worth what you'd pay for it. Sally is truly one of the legendary gurus of Texas native plants...I am in awe of her!

Will continue as I can...my computer is really screwed up, so I have to break it up into a number of posts.
.


I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Linda
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 26, 2010 6:40 PM CST
How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest by Jill Nokes
Another of the gurus of our native plants. She concentrates here on info on growing and propagating native plants, as well as info on specific species. Again, there's a fantastic amount of info in this book. Very well-researched, she calls upon those who have made propagation their life's work to contribute what they know also. I once went to the wildflower center in Austin to listen to her talk to those interested in what she had to tell them. This mainly covers the woody plants, BTW.
Remarkable Plants of Texas by Matt Warnock Turner
This book chooses a number of Texas species and in each chapter, it gives some basic info on each one, includes photos and then relates histories and stories about it. I've met him...a professor of business, but his interest in plants is evidently very strong, so he took time off to research, write this book and travel around giving talks about it. Very interesting!
Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas by George O. Miller
I like this one also...general landscaping info, lists by category and then the info on each individual plant makes it easy with the photos and info layouts.





I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Linda
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 26, 2010 8:18 PM CST
Edible and Useful Plants of Texas and the Southwest by Delena Tull
I like this, because growing edible plants is really a good thing. The more you can use or eat the plants the better. Still, I am not inclined towards crafts much. It has recipes and instructions and also warnings on the plants that are toxic or give you rashes. I grow pokeweed for the wildlife...haven't yet used it as a dye or cooked it up yet. ButI want to grow Tomatillos and try the Enchilada Calabacitas recipe! Teas are my favorite thing...did you know that Yaupon Holly can be used for a tea?
Grasses of the Texas Hill Country by Brian and Shirley Loflin
Absolutely the hardest kind of plants to ID are the grasses. I'll have to admit I'm still kind of limited there. Even some on my own property I still haven't figured out. But some are pretty easy. It has both native and introduced grasses, with photos and info. Kind of disturbing how many kinds of nonnative grasses are growing in Texas.
Trees, Shrubs and Vines of the Texas Hill Country by Jan Wrede
I know this lady and this is a more extended version of her first book, which I believe was called Texans Love Their Land. Beautiful photos and really good info on Hill Counry plants. Includes some invasive exotics and offers native alternatives to them.

I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Linda
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
LindaTX8
Dec 27, 2010 3:20 PM CST
Toxic Plants of Texas by Hart, Garland, Barr, Carpenter and Reagor
This book was obviously primarily put together for agricultural people, but it's got good photos and it's interesting to know what can be toxic for animals. Amazing how many plants were introduced as forage and yet...can be toxic. Johnsongrass, for instance...that one I'd already heard can be toxic...curses on the people who introduced it. Many of my favorite native plants can be toxic, too.
Field Guide to the Broad-Leaved Herbaceous Plants of South Texas by Everitt, Drawe and Lonard
Another one that has agricultural importance, yet has been very useful to me in identifying plants. Has good photos and mentions what livestock and wildlife consume the plants.
Tree, Shrubs and Cactus of South Texas by Everitt and Drawe
Also useful to both agricultural and plant people. Photos and brief descriptions. For me, the heights given in metric have to be converted...fortunately, many calculators can do that. This book allowed me to ID the Rock Trumpet or Flor de San Juan I'd seen in a natural area park. Later, some popped up on the edge of my property...thanks to whoever put up a fence along that property line to contain some pigs for the neighbors. Those last two South Texas books have been very useful to me.
Wildflowers, Trees, and Shrubs of Texas by Delena Tull and George O. Miller
The photos are a bit small if you ask me, but they help...also has leaf drawings in some sections. Brief descriptions for info on the plants. What I really like the most is the little maps showing what parts of the state have these plants growing wild. Very nice book.
Texas Wildflowers by Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller
Nice photos, good wildflower field guide for the whole state. I did find one mistake a species with the wrong photo above the description. But also very nice.
Plants of Central Texas Wetlands by Fleenor and Taber
Helpful in identifying wetlands plants, especially in the Ottine Wetlands of South-central Texas, although Texas wetland plants are somewhat similar in many parts of the state. Nice photos and descriptions, well done. Wish I had a true wetlands around here, but the dry creek here is usually pretty dry. We had a pretty wet fall and winter last time and a bit less so in the spring, which I noticed really changed things a LOT after the extreme drought that came before it. Now we're back to drought again...although we got a little bit of rain lately. I'd just like to be able to grow Texas Bluebells without buying a plant or two every time! Oh well.
Texas Wildflowers, A beginner's field guide to the state's most common flowers by Berly Magley and illustrated by DD Dowden.
This is a little booklet, only 32 pages that I found at a gift shop one time. Really nice colorful illustrations and descriptions of the limited species it covers.
Trees of Central Texas by Robert A. Vines
A field guide with black and white illustrations of trees and bushes and complete descriptions. Comes in handy, although color photos would be nice.










I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Mar 21, 2013 5:23 PM CST
I should not have looked at this thread. Now I want almost all of the books described! (The rest I have already.)
Porkpal

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Texas Gardening forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Dianthus 'Nyewood Cream'"