Lilies forum: What to do with a forced lily bulb at this time of the year?

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Ontario, Canada (Zone 6a)
Phenolic
Oct 3, 2015 8:11 PM CST
There were pots full of lilies and crocosmia in full bloom at a farmers' market, and I couldn't help myself. Big Grin I bought two pots of White Stargazer. Now I have no idea what to do with them, since autumn is hitting southern Canada in full force. (Rain, cold, AND wind...) I don't suppose I could expect any flowers next year if I keep them as house plants until they die back naturally?
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 4, 2015 5:20 PM CST
Go ahead and enjoy your plant inside until it is done blooming. Then, place outside in a well protected warm spot that still gets a good amount of sun--preferably up against a southern wall. Even though the temps may go below freezing at night, it takes quite a bit to totally freeze the plant. Keep it there until the stem itself turns brown. In the meantime, dig a shallow trench in a well drained area of your garden, deep enough so you can lay these pots sideways in it, and leave open. Save the top soil you dig out and store in buckets in the garage. After the stems turn brown, cut off, leaving about two inches of stub. Then, place pots sideways in the trench, cover with saved unfrozen soil and water in--even if the soil in the trench is frozen, it doesn't matter--it will re-thaw enough to settle in. Mulch lightly a couple weeks later if you think they need it. What I usually do if the ground is not yet frozen, is to mound a couple more spades of dirt over the top and then smooth it over to form somewhat of a mound. So, enjoy your lilies and sleep well. This really works great and when you dig up in the spring you can either continue to grow them in pots or plant in the garden! As long as they get the in ground winter chill, you'll have flowers, too Smiling
[Last edited by Roosterlorn - Oct 4, 2015 5:41 PM (+)]
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Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 4, 2015 5:51 PM CST
If you bought Crocosmia, that's a whole 'nother story. These are best started in the spring, they aren't very cold hardy. These are going to require some intermediate cool area like an unheated garage. I grow Crocosmia outside in zone 5b here in Wisconsin, but only with considerable care.
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6a)
Phenolic
Oct 4, 2015 9:44 PM CST
Thanks for the advice, Roosterlorn! Thank You!
It's just two pots of White Stargazer. I wasn't quite adventurous enough to buy crocosmia in full bloom at this time of the year. Big Grin Crocosmia give me enough trouble when they're in the ground!
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
Seed Starter Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Level 1
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DavidLMO
Jan 3, 2016 7:01 PM CST
Was looking for care for forced Christmas bulbs. Heh.

If you have an opportunity like this in the future, bring the pots of stargazers home and plant the bulbs. They will do fine the following year and are very hardy - whether star gazer, star fighter or Casa Blanca white oriental. Blooming in the pot is not considered forcing like a hyacinth or amarylis at Christmas. It does not wear out the bulb.

Crocosmia - let die back. Lift. Store inside. Plant next year. They would likely be problematic in the ground in your zone unless highly mulched.
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Jan 3, 2016 7:56 PM CST
DavidLMO said:Blooming [lilies] in the pot is not considered forcing like a hyacinth or amarylis at Christmas. It does not wear out the bulb.


Blooming any plant out its natural cycle is forcing, in a pot or not. But it is true that lilies tolerate forcing better than most. Amaryllis, on the other hand, are forced as a normal growth pattern, and do not "wear out" at all (when properly cared for). In fact, they thrive with this treatment.
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
Seed Starter Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Level 1
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DavidLMO
Jan 3, 2016 9:25 PM CST
My ref to Amarylas was messed up. Smiling Not on the Hyacinth though - that forcing pretty much uses it up.

An Oriental lily blooming in a pot in Summer is not forcing. Perhaps we disagree I guess. An Oriental lily blooming til done in my yard is forcing?

An Oriental lily blooming in the ground or a pot in August is entirely normal. Sure - it would appreciate being in the ground. And if it finishes in the pot, it can be planted in the ground and will do perfectly the next season. I sell hundreds of them and raise several hundred this way each year. That was my point to the OP.

Perhaps we are talking about two completely different things.
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
Image
Leftwood
Jan 3, 2016 11:24 PM CST
I never said anything was wrong with your statement about hyacinths. Shrug!

Leftwood said:Blooming any plant out its natural cycle is forcing, in a pot or not.


Oriental lilies blooming in summer is their natural cycle. So:
DavidLMO said:An Oriental lily blooming in a pot in Summer is not forcing. Perhaps we disagree I guess.


I don't see what the disagreement is. Confused You just restated what I said!

In your original post, you mentioned Christmas bulbs, so I was compelled to infer that you were talking about blooming them for Christmas (forcing), not summer. How was I to know? Still, I was careful not to accuse you of anything by making a simple statement that would cover either case, and not point any fingers. I'm just baffled by your reply.

However, if you believe growing lilies for Christmas bloom is not forcing, than we must agree to disagree. Smiling


Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
Seed Starter Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Level 1
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DavidLMO
Jan 3, 2016 11:59 PM CST
The OP picked up some Oriental Lilies blooming at a farmers market October 3. She is in Ontario.
Someone potted them up a bit late in the season. Sheesh. I suggested what she do next year if she buys some on Oct. 3. Plant them. Given the weather, she could probably still plant them. :-)

Did not mean to offend, accuse, point fingers or anything else.

I start Oriental lilies in Feb/March and every 2 weeks til late August. I have them blooming easily from Mother's Day til late Late September. One can purchase them in pots. Let them die back. Plant in their yard. And next year they will be real nice. None are forced and none are blooming out of their natural cycle.

They are not forced and have nothing to do with Christmas. I never suggested growing an Oriental Lily for Christmas.

Over and out of this thread. HAND
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976

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