Daylilies forum: Starting Daylily seeds

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Name: Tim
Omaha, NE (Zone 5b)
Daylilies
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tcmfish
Oct 25, 2015 8:21 PM CST
Going to try and start a few seeds this winter. It seems most people start them in January, why not start them sooner? Any drawbacks of starting them in November?

Thanks
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
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Natalie
Oct 25, 2015 8:26 PM CST
Welcome! to All Things Plants!

It mostly depends on where you live, and what zone you are in. Also, if you are starting them inside or out. I never start mine before March or April, even though I could probably start them a little earlier.
Natalie
Name: Peter
Allentown PA (Zone 6b)
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Nysbadmk8
Oct 25, 2015 8:34 PM CST
I start them now, I have 500 already on 3rd leaf. There are two different schools of thought here. Direct sow in fall/spring. Or start inside under lights.

I start them under lights.
Name: Steve Todd
Illinois (Zone 5b)
Region: Illinois Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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Ahead
Oct 25, 2015 8:40 PM CST
I usually start mine in November, inside in deep pots, under the lights. I started mine in September last season because I was too excited to wait.

I think many folks don't like messing with them for that long. I am not sure the seedlings were much bigger starting them early, but I didn't care. I move them out of the basement in April, and plant by the end of the month.

I say, do what makes you happy,

Steve
Name: Tim
Omaha, NE (Zone 5b)
Daylilies
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tcmfish
Oct 25, 2015 8:58 PM CST
These will be inside under lights, zone 5b.

Thanks for the quick responses looks like I'll start them soon.
Name: Steve Todd
Illinois (Zone 5b)
Region: Illinois Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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Ahead
Oct 25, 2015 9:04 PM CST
I would order some Gnatrol, I think it's called. I water with it for the first week and never have gnats. I do not nuke my soil. Nice deep pots too. Good luck!

Steve
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Oct 25, 2015 9:05 PM CST
I should have mentioned that I start mine in the greenhouse, though it isn't heated, so I guess it is a cold frame. That is why I wait until later. Starting indoors, though, I'd start them much earlier.
Natalie
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Oct 25, 2015 9:06 PM CST
Cross posted, Steve. I'm glad you mentioned the gnats! Ick! I used those glue tape things, which worked pretty good.
Natalie
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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petruske
Oct 25, 2015 10:59 PM CST
This is going to be my first time also to start growing daylilies from seeds that I collected this year. I've been reading all I can here on ATP and this is the first I heard mention of gnats. What's up with that??? What should I watch for (or avoid)? Do they come from the soil that is used?
I plan to grow them inside, on a heated porch that faces North, so I will be using T5 lighting. I was going to start them in late January. I thought I read that if you start them too early they will get spindly. Is that a concern? I hope to plant them outside late may or early June. ANY advise is oh so welcome!!! Thumbs up
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Oct 26, 2015 4:38 AM CST
petruske said:This is going to be my first time also to start growing daylilies from seeds that I collected this year. I've been reading all I can here on ATP and this is the first I heard mention of gnats. What's up with that??? What should I watch for (or avoid)? Do they come from the soil that is used?


Fungus gnats can be in the potting media you buy but it's not inevitable. The adults can fly in from the outdoors through opened doorways or windows without screens (perhaps even through screens with wide mesh since they're teeny, certainly possible if there are holes in it). They can already be in houseplant pots and can come into the house with houseplants that were outdoors for the summer. Another possibility is previously opened bags of media or ones with tears in the bag that were left outside or in a greenhouse. I only once had problem with them and that's because they came with a potted plant from a big box store. Letting the soil surface dry between waterings helps because the adults like to lay their eggs on damp organic media. While the adults can carry diseases it is the larvae that do the feeding damage below the media surface.

petruske said:I was going to start them in late January. I thought I read that if you start them too early they will get spindly. Is that a concern?


Getting spindly from being started early is caused by too low light intensity in relation to the temperature/moisture/fertilizer. Fluorescent lights lose brightness over time and plants are affected by this before our eyes can detect it and also the height of the lights above the plants can be a factor. If the conditions cause floppiness then you don't gain much from starting them early, especially if they flop enough that you feel a need to cut the leaves to shorten them. Cutting back then gives the seedlings a "double whammy" by reducing their food making ability still further and slowing them down.

(Edited to quote Sue's questions plus an afterthought on the window screens)
[Last edited by sooby - Oct 26, 2015 5:24 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #976490 (10)
Name: Steve Todd
Illinois (Zone 5b)
Region: Illinois Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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Ahead
Oct 26, 2015 5:04 AM CST
Thank you, Sue...always so helpful!

My grow lights are adjustable, so I never have to cut the leaves. That being said, getting a seedling to bloom here is still a two season process, wether I start them in September or January.

Steve
Name: Corey
Chicago (Zone 6a)
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Ispahan
Oct 26, 2015 5:34 AM CST
Fungus gnats are indeed pesky. Sooby gave great advice about letting soil surface dry between waterings to thwart the adult gnats.

For those of you interested in another type of gnat control, try some tropical/Mexican butterworts (Pinguicula sp.). They grow attractive rosettes of sticky leaves which attract and trap gnats like a magnet. They also have attractive flowers, do well under fluorescent lights or on windowsills, and are extremely easy to grow. Much better than the yellow paper glue traps!
Name: Steve Todd
Illinois (Zone 5b)
Region: Illinois Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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Ahead
Oct 26, 2015 7:11 AM CST
This is a new one for me. Sounds perfect!

Where would I find these butterworts? They aren't as addictive as daylilies are they?? I can see it now...my newest registration.....CLOWN WARTS...lol.

Seriously, sounds like a perfect plan!

Steve
Name: Corey
Chicago (Zone 6a)
Daylilies Hybridizer Hummingbirder Salvias Bee Lover Bulbs
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Ispahan
Oct 26, 2015 2:12 PM CST
CLOWN WARTS...lol!

Pinguicula are collectible and their footprint is generally small, but I don't think they are as consuming or as addictive as daylilies.

I got mine from Cascade Carnivores (http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/). They have a nice selection of butterworts and also sell a great potting media, the all-mineral Pinguicula mix.

Pinguicula are different from most other carnivorous plants in that they are not bog plants, they can tolerate (and appreciate) higher soil fertility and while they do appreciate good water quality they do not require distilled/RO water like many other carnivorous plants. I have even heard of people growing them in potting soil straight out of the bag.

They are an interesting, highly attractive group of plants and EXTREMELY adept at catching gnats. I find them less fussy than African violets.

A few very easy types I have grown for years:

Aphrodite
agnata (all forms)
moranensis (all forms but highly recommend J and A)
Gina
Tina
Titan
Sethos

Name: Dnd
SE Michigan (Zone 6a)
Dog Lover Daylilies Organic Gardener Houseplants Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Ideas: Level 1
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DogsNDaylilies
Oct 26, 2015 3:51 PM CST
Ahead said: can see it now...my newest registration.....CLOWN WARTS


Hilarious!
Name: Dnd
SE Michigan (Zone 6a)
Dog Lover Daylilies Organic Gardener Houseplants Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Ideas: Level 1
I helped beta test the first seed swap
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DogsNDaylilies
Oct 26, 2015 3:55 PM CST
Ispahan said:CLOWN WARTS...lol!

Pinguicula are collectible and their footprint is generally small, but I don't think they are as consuming or as addictive as daylilies.

I got mine from Cascade Carnivores (http://www.cascadecarnivores.com/). They have a nice selection of butterworts and also sell a great potting media, the all-mineral Pinguicula mix.

Pinguicula are different from most other carnivorous plants in that they are not bog plants, they can tolerate (and appreciate) higher soil fertility and while they do appreciate good water quality they do not require distilled/RO water like many other carnivorous plants. I have even heard of people growing them in potting soil straight out of the bag.

They are an interesting, highly attractive group of plants and EXTREMELY adept at catching gnats. I find them less fussy than African violets.

A few very easy types I have grown for years:

Aphrodite
agnata (all forms)
moranensis (all forms but highly recommend J and A)
Gina
Tina
Titan
Sethos



Corey, thank you for the wonderful information! I purchased a Venus fly trap and a pitcher plant early this year to control our gnats with plants, but the gnats were to small to trigger the trip hairs on the fly trap and they didn't seem to be affected by the pitcher plant. I want to try one of these Butterworts!

As a side note for others, if you wish to control your pest problem without plants, try mixing a couple of drops of dish detergent into a sugar water mixture. It works like a charm for me.
Name: Dennis
SW Michigan (Zone 5a)
Daylilies
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Dennis616
Oct 26, 2015 4:11 PM CST
I also will be starting some seed for the first time! Almost done building a very small insulated seedling rack in my unheated pole barn.
Thumb of 2015-10-26/Dennis616/c4b13d
This is not really my “thing” so just trying to hack something together Hilarious! But this has been fun

I was planning on starting them in February, but from what I'm reading here I’m thinking I could go earlier. How big of a pot will I need-- 1 gallon plant pots? Smaller the better so I can get a few more seedlings in here. But truthfully my seedling bed is small so I have to stick with low numbers. Quality over quantity I guess Big Grin

Name: Steve Todd
Illinois (Zone 5b)
Region: Illinois Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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Ahead
Oct 26, 2015 4:11 PM CST
Thanks Corey....great information! learn something new every day!

And Dennis, I use 1 gallon pots. Good luck!

Steve
[Last edited by Ahead - Oct 26, 2015 4:14 PM (+)]
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Name: Becky
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Butterflies Seed Starter Container Gardener
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beckygardener
Oct 26, 2015 5:25 PM CST
1 gallon pots to start seeds? Why such a large container?

That size pot would never work for me as I have numerous crosses I want to start seeds from. I just use cups. I usually start a 100 or so seeds on my south window sill.
http://garden.org/ideas/view/beckygardener/1839/Growing-Dayl...

I do have a question about the gnats .... if you did bottom watering after the initial watering, would that deter gnats? I place all my cups into a plastic shoe box bin and could bottom water them instead of top watering.
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters, compared to what lies within us.
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Name: Tim
Omaha, NE (Zone 5b)
Daylilies
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tcmfish
Oct 26, 2015 5:50 PM CST
I will be using solo cups as that is what I've seen others do. I think the pots would be better once they are plants, right? I will also be doing bottom watering, using some old aquariums to house my cups.

And using the "on the rocks" method to germinate seeds.

Anyways my next question is, I ordered 30 seeds, sounds like I might get more than that with bonuses and all. I only have space for 28 cups at the moment. It seems many people put multiple seeds per cup, is there a reason for this? I would think less competition would be better but maybe I'm wrong. Obviously if I put more than one in a cup it will be from the same cross. Is there an ideal number to shoot for?

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