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Team First Generation or Second-Generation Gardener?

By Trish
August 14, 2011

I've been thinking a lot about the word "heritage" lately. This week's Team Article explores if part of your heritage is a gardening one.

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Name: Carol
Lincolnshire, UK
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: United Kingdom Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Irises
Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
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okus
Aug 15, 2011 2:09 AM CST
Being a family historian I am amazed by the number of my antecedants who have 'Gardner-Domestic' as their occupation on the census forms, way back to when those started in 1841. It seems the soil is in my blood!

Mother wasn't a gardner at all, but her parents were and from them I learned a lot. My beloved grandpa grew all the families vegetables and soft fruit, so that in war time, and post war, Britain when others were rationed hard we were never hungry. (He also was a pig farmer but that's another story!) I followed him everywhere from the time I could toddle and learned not to pick the strawberry flowers to give to grandma!. An easy mistake for a 2 year old to make. *Blush*
Grandma loved flowers and had a very pretty flower garden which she tended daily and there were nearly always fresh flowers in the house. There were also wonderful pies and pastries and pots and jars filled with the produce from grandad's allotment. She was a cook before she married so that skill was passed on along with the gardening.

My father grew fruit trees, He grew up in New Zealand on a Peach Farm and learned to manage trees and their produce there for maximum production. We had Apples, Pears and Plums of multiple varieties from our English garden all year round. He enjoyed grafting, and not just fruit, so that was another skill tucked away. Back in the early 1950s people were always amazed to see purple and white lilac growing on the same tree. I used to see folk in the village trying to take seed and occasionally cuttings to grow one just like it which of course never worked!

Then I married a gardener too - also at least second generation. Now he does the flowers and I do the veg (in theory) though the demarkation line is very fuzzy. However only one of our three children gardens so it isn't totally hereditory!!


Carol

[Last edited by okus - Aug 14, 2011 9:20 PM (+)]
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Name: Trish
Jacksonville, TX (Zone 8a)
I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Roses Herbs Vegetable Grower
Composter Canning and food preservation Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Organic Gardener Forum moderator Hummingbirder
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Trish
Aug 16, 2011 12:44 AM CST

Garden.org Admin

Great story, Carol! Thanks for sharing!
NGA COO, Wife, Mom, and caretaker of 90 acres and all that dwell there.
Name: Susie
Phoenix AZ (Zone 9a)
Southwest Gardening~ moderator/ATP.
Charter ATP Member Tip Photographer Forum moderator Region: Southwest Gardening Garden Ideas: Level 2 Roses
Birds Region: United States of America Garden Art Dog Lover Daylilies Hummingbirder
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Aguane
Aug 16, 2011 12:03 PM CST
Thanks, Carol.
Interesting and how fortunate for your family to be blessed with a "food grower" during the war. The first thing that came to my mind re growing your own food during wartime was "where do you get your water"? Not to sound too simple I just wondered since our water in Phoenix must be "delivered" to us... which means someone does that job and doesn't go to war.

I haven't thought of the war for a long time. I'd forgotten of the practice of "rationing" though even my grandparents in San Francisco were living with rationing during the war and certainly during the 1906 earthquake. In such a dire time it's amazing to me that people really organize and do the right thing, effectively, for all the people. We are very fortunate to live in the societies we do live in Britain or U.S. or any of the "developed countries".
“Don't give up too quickly"... unknown, I heard it somewhere.
~ All Things Plants, SOUTHWEST GARDENING ~Cubits.org ENERGY & POWER
Name: Carol
Lincolnshire, UK
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: United Kingdom Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Irises
Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
Image
okus
Aug 16, 2011 1:53 PM CST
Susie in England water isn't quite the issue it is in Arizona - it rains here - a lot!!

Grandfather collected rain water off the rooves of the house and all the sheds and pig styes for the garden. Domestic water arrived via pipes though and that was never rationed. Some people were in 'reserved occupations' farmers and water works people amonst them. However in Britain many women, who hadn't worked in peace time, took over the mens jobs so that they could go to war. We had a Women's Land Army who took over from farm labourers and did many other jobs too.
Carol

Name: Susie
Phoenix AZ (Zone 9a)
Southwest Gardening~ moderator/ATP.
Charter ATP Member Tip Photographer Forum moderator Region: Southwest Gardening Garden Ideas: Level 2 Roses
Birds Region: United States of America Garden Art Dog Lover Daylilies Hummingbirder
Image
Aguane
Aug 16, 2011 1:57 PM CST
OK, I understand about the water. My dad went to war in the Pacific. My mom was at Stanford for college at the time and along with her mostly female classmates spent many, many days working in the farm lands in Santa Clara Valley.
“Don't give up too quickly"... unknown, I heard it somewhere.
~ All Things Plants, SOUTHWEST GARDENING ~Cubits.org ENERGY & POWER

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