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Hardwood Cuttings: Tips and Tricks

By midnight21
November 16, 2015

Make more trees, shrubs, and woody perennials by learning to do successful hardwood cuttings.

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Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Nov 17, 2015 10:28 AM CST
As someone who has rooted hardwood (and semi-hardwood and softwood) cuttings for 35 years, this simple approach does work for a select number of species. It is very easy, and something everyone could (and should) try. Hurray! But, don't be dissuaded if results are disappointing. The writer's mild winter climate (which he does not mention) is a critical factor with this regime, and most hardwood cuttings will require a rooting hormone (usually IBA) or a greenhouse intermittent misting setup (or some such additional accommodations) and for some, a 12-18 month period.

As I mentioned, the simple method describe in this garden idea will work on a small subset of woody plants. It's a great first introduction to stem cutting propagation. Thumbs up
However, I might suggest that the writer list the species with which success was achieved, so as not to set up a novice to fail.

Name: John
St.Osyth Nr Clacton on Sea. E
Region: United Kingdom Hybridizer Garden Ideas: Master Level Ferns Butterflies Salvias
Hostas Heucheras Clematis Birds Bee Lover Daylilies
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midnight21
Nov 17, 2015 1:33 PM CST
Hi Rick

First, what do you call mild. We often go down to minus 5F, and a couple of years has seen our village cut off by snow for a few days. As for types. I only do it now with a few, as I only have a garden 50 x 50ft. I am drawing on interest from many years ago when I trained at Capel Manor horticultural college just outside London. This was only supposed to give a general idea for people to try. As I always try to get over to people when I give talks, is, If it doesn't work the first time try again until it does. Experiment. That is the way to learn. Also don't forget the U.S. is a little bit bigger than our little island, so what one person there may grow will be different to someone in another part of the country. Anyway I still stress to people have a go, it won't cost you anyting.

Regards

John.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
Image
Leftwood
Nov 17, 2015 4:48 PM CST
Leftwood said:It is very easy, and something everyone could (and should) try. Hurray!

Leftwood said: But, don't be dissuaded if results are disappointing.

Leftwood said:It's a great first introduction to stem cutting propagation. Thumbs up


We are in agreement!!!!!!!
I am at a loss to explain this more clearly, and I thought the Hurray and Thumbs up emoticons would reinforce this even more. I speak American English, not the English spoken across the pond, and perhaps that is the source of the miscommunication?

Whether or not to offer specifics to help the novice propagator, that is your prerogative. This is where we differ, and everyone has their own opinions.

Have a great day!





Name: Angie
Concord, NC (zone 7)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Winter Sowing Region: North Carolina Daylilies Roses
Clematis Butterflies Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Seed Starter
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Hemophobic
Nov 18, 2015 9:42 AM CST
Great tips and always worth a try. Where would we be without experimentation?
I think that if ever a mortal heard the voice of God it would be in a garden at the cool of the day. ~F. Frankfort Moore, A Garden of Peace

Name: eljane joy salma
philippines
eljanejoy
Nov 30, 2015 5:10 AM CST
what is best season to that thing like here in the Philippines, we got only two season. the wet and dry season.
Name: John
St.Osyth Nr Clacton on Sea. E
Region: United Kingdom Hybridizer Garden Ideas: Master Level Ferns Butterflies Salvias
Hostas Heucheras Clematis Birds Bee Lover Daylilies
Image
midnight21
Nov 30, 2015 5:17 AM CST

Oh eljanejoy, I wish we had your problem. Over here in England, no two days are the same. Friday it was bright a mild, Saturday a hard frost. Yesterday blowing a gale, and today still windy and raining. What I would do is try both seasons and see which one works. I would think the wet one. Good luck.

John. Confused
Name: eljane joy salma
philippines
eljanejoy
Nov 30, 2015 5:46 AM CST
by the month of july until half of dec wet season then by jan until june dry season.
Name: John
St.Osyth Nr Clacton on Sea. E
Region: United Kingdom Hybridizer Garden Ideas: Master Level Ferns Butterflies Salvias
Hostas Heucheras Clematis Birds Bee Lover Daylilies
Image
midnight21
Nov 30, 2015 5:56 AM CST
Try the July first, and see what happens.

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