Sempervivum and Jovibarba forum: The learning curve is steep in Texas

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Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Nov 29, 2015 8:41 PM CST
I have 13 new semps from Lynn that I planted alittle over a month ago. I thought they were settling in well but now we have had 3 days of cold rainy weather. The pots are in protected areas under the eaves but looks like there is some rotting. I brought in the pots and they are in a unheated garage with a light until the sun returns...tomorrow.
Should I replant them with more drainage...right now they are in well draining potting mix but not one with 1/2 sand or gravel...Well now I know I should have read through all the threads before.....Any advice is welcome!
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Name: Greg Colucci
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
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gg5
Nov 29, 2015 11:03 PM CST
Hi Anna, I would say gently pick off the dead leaves on the one rosette in first photo, maybe uproot it and take them off, trying to leave the rosette intact as much as possible - from these damaged rosettes come twins or crests or other interesting things as the chick revives itself! Thumbs up
The other plants look fine, just a bit tired, have you given them any water at all? I can't tell if the soil is totally dry, but it looks like it might be, and I think they like a little bit of moisture all year - just not much. In the last pot that little one might not make it, again I'd gently remove the dead leaves (I use a tweezers) Good luck!
I tip my hat to you.
Plants bring me peace and calm, more of what we all need Smiling
Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Nov 30, 2015 8:00 AM CST
Thanks for the encouragement. Well I am glad they just look tired and not in failing health! They have been soaked from the rain , so water is not the problem. That was one of the reasons I didn't add alot of sand/gravel to the mix, because generally rain is sparse. Well, I will keep them in the the present potting mix and do a little tweezers manicure for now.
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
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valleylynn
Nov 30, 2015 10:55 AM CST

Moderator

To add to what Greg said above, come next spring I would add more soil to the containers, the ones that the plants are sitting way down in the pot. They really need good air flow to stay healthy.
You don't want to do transplanting this time of year, they are semi-dormant right now and would not do well trying to regrow roots.
Name: Tim Stoehr
Canby, Oregon (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Region: Pacific Northwest Vegetable Grower Cactus and Succulents Sedums Bee Lover
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tcstoehr
Nov 30, 2015 11:42 AM CST
Keeping them outside but out of the rain (under the eves) seems like quite a reasonable situation. These guys like being outside in the winter, although I don't know exactly how cold it gets where you are. I doubt it gets too cold for semps, as they are quite cold hardy. I would prefer to leave them outside keeping in mind that they are in pots that may freeze solid, in which case some protection would be advisable.
I am not optimistic about the top plant in the first picture. We can't tell from a picture but to my eye that plant looks like it is progressively rotting. I can see down at the lower left another leaf is slowly falling victim. It is not too unusual to lose a few like this. I had one do exactly the same thing on one side like that. When I finally pulled it up I could tell the core of the plant was fatally rotting. I suspect the same with your plant. If you want to take emergency measures, you can try what gg5 says. At that time you could feel around and see if you think the core of the plant is rotting, in which case it unfortunately has earned a one-way trip to the compost bin. I'm a bit harsher than most, when I see rot I want to see it gone ASAP. I'm sorry but "buh-bye", you're outta here. IMO, in the end it matters little. That pot of yours will still fill up and overflow with the three remaining plants. And these things multiply like crazy which requires getting rid of the offsets/chicks one way or the other. Semp growers are constantly disposing of excess offsets that are perfectly healthy, I have no problem getting rid of rotters.
The others look pretty good with the exception of the bottom one in the third picture. I has a little something going on that I can't judge from a picture. Maybe just some physical damage from transplanting. Keep an eye on it.
Name: Debra
Garland, TX (NE Dallas suburb) (Zone 8a)
Service dogs: Angels with paws.
Dragonflies Dog Lover I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Photography Bee Lover Plays in the sandbox
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lovemyhouse
Nov 30, 2015 12:07 PM CST
Anna, rain has been crazy, hasn't it? I will be interested to know of this progression, particularly through the spring next year. If you can grow them, I can grow them. Whistling Hilarious!
If you don't ask, the answer is always 'no.'
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Nov 30, 2015 12:40 PM CST
Anna, I'm growing some under the eave to protect them from too much rain and so far that has worked. Mostly mine are growing in hanging pots. I've had the most problems with the summer temperatures which most don't like. I had one rot when we had all the rain in May and I removed it and left the rosettes unplanted in a clay pot sitting under the eave. I didn't plant them until late August. A few are looking like they may make it yet. I have a couple that handle more sun and the heat better, but most of them look better if they have dappled shade in the hot months. I brought those hanging ones inside this week when it continued to rain. They are back out now. I'm going on four years now with a couple.
Donald
Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Cinta
Nov 30, 2015 3:37 PM CST
We were hotter than ever this summer. I put all mine in shade and they loved it. I gave them no sun all summer.

I am not familiar of your winter conditions but I have a lot of rain that turns to freezing rain to snow. So pots would be a block of ice even if I had them protected under a building over hang because of blowing rain, freezing rain, snow. That brought me to the no soil planting.

I have lots of pine needles so I use those with leftover aquarium gravel, and just a sprinkle of soil on top. I have not lost any in pots when I started growing them in that soiless mixture. It is what they grow in on the mountains (a drop of soil and rocks).
Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Nov 30, 2015 6:12 PM CST
Generally our winters have about 3 - 4 freezing spells that last a day or two, would you agree Debra and Donald? That is a good observation Donald. I never thought that some varieties would be hardier to make through a hot summer.Do you know the names of those 4 year olds?
Last year , two pots make it through the winter all covered with leaves... so that made me think I should not worry about adding drainage...well that might have been the wrong conclusion. Rolling my eyes. They survived the summer in the shade being watered every 3 days or so. Interesting no soil recipe Cinta. I think here in Texas that might be a baking sheet nodding If I end up with lots of chicks I will experiment
Thankyou Lynn for the pot comment. I thought it would be cute to grow them in mugs with a drain hole drilled but maybe it wasn't such a good idea.
Tim,I like your attitude about "buh-bye", I will try to pick off the dead pieces, but will only feel bad if they all die
Name: Debra
Garland, TX (NE Dallas suburb) (Zone 8a)
Service dogs: Angels with paws.
Dragonflies Dog Lover I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Photography Bee Lover Plays in the sandbox
Butterflies Region: Texas I sent a postcard to Randy! Charter ATP Member Annuals Garden Sages
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lovemyhouse
Nov 30, 2015 6:27 PM CST
Anna, yes, I think it is about that. Do have some cold lows (16 degrees last winter), but we rarely have any sustained below freezing temperatures.
If you don't ask, the answer is always 'no.'
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Nov 30, 2015 7:28 PM CST
I think it's a bit colder as you go west in Texas. It's erratic, to say the least. I find the warm night temperatures beginning in spring and lasting through summer to be one of the most limiting factors in growing many plants. There's no cool off when the sun sets. In many areas with equally hot day temps, the nights cool off. Mostly that doesn't happen in most of Texas. Any plant that is a derivative of an alpine habitat will likely need something to mitigate the relentless warm temps. I think it's not necessarily the sun. Many alpine plants get lots of exposure to sunlight at high altitudes, but they get a chance to do some repair at night.
Donald
Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Cinta
Nov 30, 2015 7:33 PM CST
Anna I can imagine them baking in Texas. I have not experienced a Texas winter but I have experienced their summer. I moved all my semps to shade this year because we stayed in the 90s for two months this summer. My soiless mixture they would have dried up and died if I did not water probably twice a day every day.
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
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valleylynn
Nov 30, 2015 7:48 PM CST

Moderator

Anna, they will be fine in the mugs with drain holes, just fill the mug up almost to the top with soil. That way the semps will be up at the top of the mug where they will get good air circulation.
Name: Greg Colucci
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Sedums Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 1
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gg5
Nov 30, 2015 9:58 PM CST
I love that there are now several folks trying to grow semps in warmer conditions! This is a great spot to compare notes on it!!! Thumbs up
Cinta I agree that when it is hot out the semps don't need full sun. Some of mine are in window boxes along a parking lot, therefor the sun/shade levels are dependent on who is parked where. It is bright shade though and I think that is important, and they do get some direct sun here in Seattle (where we consider heat wave at 80+ haha!)
Glad this thread is happening! Hurray!
Plants bring me peace and calm, more of what we all need Smiling
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Dec 1, 2015 6:06 AM CST
gg5 said: ..............here in Seattle (where we consider heat wave at 80+ haha!)
.............


That could be our 'cool down' temperature at night. Mid 60sF to low 70sF would be really cool. There are many plants in the succulent group that rebel against that.
Donald
Name: Greg Colucci
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Sedums Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 1
Garden Art Birds Dog Lover Cat Lover Region: Pacific Northwest Hummingbirder
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gg5
Dec 1, 2015 5:36 PM CST
needrain said:

That could be our 'cool down' temperature at night. Mid 60sF to low 70sF would be really cool. There are many plants in the succulent group that rebel against that.

Donald I know all those lovely echevaria's that I have to grow indoors except for a couple months in our summer Rolling on the floor laughing

Plants bring me peace and calm, more of what we all need Smiling
Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Dec 1, 2015 6:40 PM CST
Wow...is it that cold in Seattle?
I found my tweezers and picked off the rotting leaves. It was kind of fun. The centers weren't rotting so that was good. I was amazed how much root formation there was in just a month.
Name: Greg Colucci
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Sedums Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 1
Garden Art Birds Dog Lover Cat Lover Region: Pacific Northwest Hummingbirder
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gg5
Dec 1, 2015 6:53 PM CST
Root formation is a good thing nodding Yes Seattle stays mild most of the year and then gets chilly in winter Whistling rarely uncomfortable humidity, just enough to keep your skin moisturized Hilarious!
Plants bring me peace and calm, more of what we all need Smiling
Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Dec 1, 2015 9:55 PM CST
I was there in August and was amazed about how green it was (compared to Dallas area). I loved all the fir trees and luckily had lots of sunshine. Hmm..does that mean you guys all look younger?
Name: Greg Colucci
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Sedums Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 1
Garden Art Birds Dog Lover Cat Lover Region: Pacific Northwest Hummingbirder
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gg5
Dec 1, 2015 11:43 PM CST
Anna were you here just this past August? This year was warmer and sunnier than usual so things weren't as green
Green Grin!
Plants bring me peace and calm, more of what we all need Smiling

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