Landscape Photo #4061: How well balanced!

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Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin
hampartsum
Jan 15, 2016 7:11 PM CST
Hello Neil, the balance of color, structure and texture is amazing! Thanks for sharing the pic. I am a bit puzzled by some other plants that are not tagged. Could you let me know what the white spikes are ( next to the yellow spikes at the back? The yellows look like Ligularia to me. Also the red flowers in the ground just under the Lillium you tagged. The other red flowers in a pot seem Fuchsias. Thank you Arturo
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Jan 16, 2016 6:44 AM CST
Thanks so much Arturo! The spiky yellow and white plants are a native here commonly called Moth Mullein Moth Mullein (Verbascum blattaria)
Along the road sides they usually only reach a third of that height and have daintier spikes, but in rich garden soil they were over 6' tall. I intended to tag them but had forgotten the species at that moment. Under that lily are some Jacob Cline Monarda blooms and a reddish orange begonia in a pot. The begonia is a boliviensis hybrid tuberous type that handles our summer heat and humidity nicely. You are correct, there are ligularia in the bed also Thumbs up
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin
hampartsum
Jan 16, 2016 8:46 AM CST
Thank you so much, Neil, your native plants are very attractive! Perhaps you may know of the well known Dutch landscape gardener, Piet Oudolf,that has designed and help develop "wild " gardens for the Millenium Lurie gardens in Chicago , also for the N. Y.Botannical gardens. He extensively used American wild native plants for his stunningly beautiful gardens. He says that gardens could easily do well with American natives because of their diversity and ornamental value. Your specific Verbascum is an annual or short lived perennial ?. Here I keep self sown Verbascum thapsus that shows up here and there, and grows enormous stately spikes, It is an introduced species that grows along road banks in very unfavorable conditions and yet very ornamental. I think it is also known as Indian Tobacco.
Your pic defintely urged me to inquire more, although I didn't stop to pay my attention to the photograph which is also very beautiful. I just went straight inside the picture roaming inside the bed! I love watching what others do with plants even more that pic itself. Thank You! again Arturo
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Jan 16, 2016 2:31 PM CST
This verbascum is either bienniel or a short lived perennial. Verbascum thapsus also grows wild here. I have a wildflower area where I allow one or two plants each year (and weed out several others). It is a most impressive plant! I misspoke above- I don't have Ligularia in that bed, but was thinking Lysimachia instead. I don't think any of the lysimachia shows in the photo. I do love Ligularia and have grown them at my previous garden, but I find them to be too moisture loving to prosper as well here.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi

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