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magicleaf
Jan 26, 2016 12:35 AM CST
hello

The tips of the leafs of my aloa are getting pale and some are shriveled.
What caould be the cause ?


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1dl od aged water per month, without fertilizer. cacti soil.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Jan 26, 2016 5:09 AM CST
Welcome! magicleaf
Is this plant indoors? Maybe the air is too dry?

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magicleaf
Jan 26, 2016 6:13 AM CST
thank u Smiling

yes in appartemnt, dry air i guess. no moisturizer.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Jan 26, 2016 6:23 AM CST
That would do it. You might want to mist them from time to time - this really goes for all houseplants in a heated house or apartment.

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magicleaf
Jan 27, 2016 12:38 AM CST
I will try that. How much watering during winter days?
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
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Dutchlady1
Jan 27, 2016 4:10 AM CST
only water when the soil is dry. like DRY.
Name: Karen
NM , AZ (Zone 7b)
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plantmanager
Jan 27, 2016 1:30 PM CST
I find that having a moisture meter helps beginning gardeners know when to water. If you have one you won't be over watering your aloe. They are inexpensive and available nearly everywhere. Here is an example:
http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Indoor-Outdoor-Moisture-Hygro...

Your aloe needs very little water. I have them outdoors in hot, dry Arizona. They get water if it rains, and maybe once a month if I remember to water. They do well regardless.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jan 27, 2016 3:06 PM CST
I agree about watering when dry, and the utility of a moisture meter in figuring out the right watering interval.

You want the soil to go properly dry at depth (or nearly so) but there is no advantage in allowing it to stay dry for any extended period, unless dormancy is your goal. What tends to happen with water deprivation is similar to what you're observing with your aloe (tip burn and dieback).

My advice for growing aloes would be to give them as much light as possible (some of these whitish plants might not like a lot of direct sun, but bright light is key). Indoors that means right by a window which gets daily sun. (Window glass cuts the UV so indoor sun is kinder than outdoor sun.) The exposure helps ensure that the soil dries out faster (direct and indirect effects), so overwatering is less likely to be a concern. My mix is about 50% pumice, which helps in that regard too.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jan 27, 2016 3:11 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1044629 (8)

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magicleaf
Jan 31, 2016 12:43 PM CST
thx all for advice. aloa is moved next to the window.
this is how it looked when i bought it 1 year ago.

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i removed clay balls so plant spread. it doesnt't looks so nice anymore Rolling my eyes.

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[Last edited by magicleaf - Jan 31, 2016 12:44 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1047613 (9)
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Jan 31, 2016 1:33 PM CST
I think it looks lovely.

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magicleaf
Feb 7, 2016 7:40 AM CST
I put aloa next to window and leafs are going up again but tops are still pale and yellow, even more i think.
Maybe i made a mistake and watering a bit, mosturing on leafs and soil surface.
Today i get plant out of bowl and soli is all dry, also the root. nothing wet or rotten.
Will put them in separate bowls. I was thinking maybe its to little soli for overgrown plant but root didnt spread out of that cube *photo1*


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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Feb 8, 2016 11:48 AM CST
Typically, I do not wet the leaves of my aloe, unless it is rainwater, temps are warm and it is outdoors. If succulents are indoors during winter, then I really slow down and got to allow the plant to dry and just water direct soil media sparingly, and allowed to drain.

Hmm..I like clay rocks, my succulents love those, allows the roots to absorb moisture nicely and breathe, really good for aeration, and it will be hard to overwater them with it.

I like to give my aloes a gritty media, so I often use just cacti media with added pumice, or some of those clay rocks too. Hope your plant recovers after the repot, good luck!
Name: Thijs van Soest
Mesa, AZ (Zone 9b)
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mcvansoest
Feb 8, 2016 1:51 PM CST
I think Baja and the others make some very good points about watering Aloes in pots.
To me, it is not clear from your pictures, which leaves are being affected by the shriveling and yellowing. New leaves just opened up from the center of the rosette or older leaves that are among the outer layer of leaves of the rosette? If the latter this could just a normal part of the lifecycle of the plant (following Baja's comments): older leaves sometimes die off as they are being replaced with new leaves as the plant grows and in addition many Aloes suffer significant leaf die-off during their dormant period and it might suggest you have been watering it too infrequently. Turns out that xeric plants that might be OK without water for weeks to months at a time when in the ground, become almost as water needy as many regular houseplants when put in pots in a low humidity environment. I water my in-house Aloes at least once every two weeks when the heat is one and if necessary more frequently.

However, if it is the new leaves that are showing this behavior then you probably have a problem that goes a little beyond a simple lack of water.
From your last picture, it would seem that these plants have very few roots. If those were the roots left after you took the plant(s) out of their pot/soil, you probably had significant root die back at some point. Given how full of plant that pot was there should have been a pretty tightly held together rootball in there. I suspect the leaf tips are drying out because the plant has lost a lot of root mass at some point. This can happen due to under and over watering, but overwatering usually leads to rot that more often than not also gets the plant itself. So this might also point to this plant not quite getting enough water.

I think the advice of very fast draining soil is really good (I use 50% pumice with 50% cactus mix), but if you go to that you need to up your watering frequency, because that kind of fast drying soil will be dry in a matter of days, not weeks, especially in-house when the heat is on, and just watering once a month will drive the plant into dormancy leading to loss of root mass, followed by drying out and yellowing of leaves.

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